A Selection of Curious Articles from the Gentleman's Magazine: I. Ancient and modern literature, criticism, and philology. II. Philosophy and natural history

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme; and J. Munday, Oxford., 1809

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Contents

The ProverbAt LatterLammasexplained
68
On the Propriety of language in the Lords Prayer
70
The Author of the Whole Duty of
80
Sir ISAAC NEWTON on the Ancient Year
82
XVII Classic Authors perverted
87
Obscure Phrases explained
88
Critical Explanations of the word EÁRING
89
Biblical Diſficulty obviated XXI Ancient and Fabulous History not always alle gorical
94
Virgil illustrated
97
Comment on the old play of ALBUMAZAR
98
A Passage in JUVENAL explained
102
Criticism on a Passage in VIRGIL
104
Critical Remarks on Horace XXVII Critique on a Passage in Paradise Lost XXVIII Chaucers Description of the Sleep of Plants
110
Critique on a Passage in HORACE
112
Observations on an obsolete Latin word
113
A Passage in Virgil explained
115
A brief account of the various Translations of the Bible into English
116
Account of the Translators of the Bible
120
A Passage in Cicero DE SENECTUTE corrected from â
124
The pretended power of Witchcraft over the winds
126
A Passage in P Mela considered
131
Critical Remarks on a Passage in SHAKESPEAREs 110 1112 113 115 116 120 124 126 131 OTHELLO
134
On the Conversion of Sr Paul XXXIX On the Ellipsis
140
Origin of some common Phrases
142
Derivation of the phraseto Run a Muck
143
Origin of the word Assassin
146
Account of the Collation and Revision of the English Bible by Dr BLAYNEY
148
XLIV Remarks on the Huetiana and a Passage in VIRGIL
151
On Translation Mickles Lusiad
152
On the Mistakes of eminent Authors
157
Martial and Statius on the Bath of CLAUDIUS EtrusCUS 159 EtrusCUS
159
Greek Inscription to be read backwards as well as forwards T
160
The AdageQuem Jupiter vult perdere 8c illus trated
162
Critique on Virgil and an Inquiry into the pro priety of some passages in Silius ITALICUS
164
Critique on SHAKESPEARE
170
Critical Remarks on the Tragedies of SENECA
172
Critical Remarks on some passages in V PATER CULUS and PETRONIUS
174
Inquiry as to the real author of the book De Imi
177
Superiority of SHAKESPEAREs Description of Night
182
Objections to Popes Translation of Homers De scription of Night
186
Various Descriptions of Night compared
188
Critical Illustrations of obsolete Passages in SHAKESPEARE
192
The Latin AdageIncidiş in Scyllam c whence taken
199
Of names retained when their origin is disused
200
NUGÆ VENALEŞ PUGNA PORÇORUM 7
208
Conjecture on an obscure Passage in SHAKESPEARE
212
On the introduction of Letters into Greece
213
Origin of Old Nick
215
On the Crasis a Grammatical Figure
216
On the word ORMESTA
223
Sameness of certain dissimilar words
224
Criticism on Grays Bard
237
On the word Bleak
238
NINE Love at Cards or other Games ex plained
239
An Emendation of a Passage in Virgil
240
Popes Epitaph on Gay borrowedHAMMONDs Elegies
242
Addition to Grays Churchyard Elegy
244
Origin of the word Firm
245
BENTHAM and Gray on Saxon and Gothic Architecture
249
Anecdotes of Literature by Dr JOHNSON
253
Remarks on WebBs Inquiry into the Beau ties of Painting c
256
Strictures on Walpoles Anecdotes of Painting
263
Mixed Passions sometimes not improperly expressed
266
Critique on the word Purpureus
269
140
315
Parallel Passages in Authors of Note
320
On Popes Imitations of our early Poets
323
Critique on a Passage in VIRGIL
328
Ştrictures on Dr Johnsons Criticism on Mil
329
Strictures on the promiscuous use of the Arti cles A and AN
333
Melancholy Despair and Grief as described by the Poets
338
Strictures on the use of the Interjection on
341
LANGELAND Author of Pierce Plowmans Visions
345
Remarks on DRYDENs Ode in Memory of Mrs KILLIGREW 347 KILLIGREW
347
Union of Imagination and Judgment indispensa bly required in Poetry
351
Bourn whence probably derived
356
On Imitation and Originality
357
CII TURL at Oxford whence so named
359
An Emendation in Miltons Paradise Lost
360
On the Particle un
362
4
363
Pen and Pin defined
366
Etymology of PONTIFEX
367
A List of Local Expressions with Illustrations
368
Critique on VIRGIL
373
Solecisms in the Works of English Authors
374
Addisons Observations on Virgils ACHATES O
378
On the Authenticity of the Arabian Tales by Dr RUSGELL
382
Dissertation on Accents
385
Page
391
though she had lost her tongue
404
Dissertation on a Poison of the Ancients called
414
YII History and culture of Cochineal
423
The cause of the lustre or resplendency of the Sea
434
Account of an inflammable Well
443
XVIÍÍ Fire from the Bowels of a Beast
445
Earthquakes how produced 4 46
446
Account of a moving Hill
448
History of Northern Lights in England
450
Curious Discoveries in making new Roads in Northamptonshire
454
Places in England where natural curiosities 457 abound
457
Discoveries of Fossil Dones in several Counties
460
Fossils in the Vicinity of Oxford
468
On the Coluber of Virgil
471
On the Phenomenon of Dew 471
473
Observations on the Gossamer
476
On the Influx of Water into the Mediterranean
479
Immense Chesnut Tree at Tamworth
487
Remarkable Phenomenon of the Bath Waters
488
Account of Fires kindled of themselves
489
On the prodigious Growth of Trees
492
On Archbishop Seckers Death and the Brit tleness of Human Bones in Frosts
494
Whether Oily Substances are hurtful to the Bones? XXXVI Curious Account of the Dissection of Old Park
497
from a Manuscript of Dr Harvey
499
Description of a Stone Later
500
On the Stature and Figure of Old Persons
502
The Cruelty of Collectors of Insects censured
504
On the Process of Vegetation in Trees
505
Extraordinary Effects of Pestilential Winds
506
On the Leviathan
509
Stones not hurtful to Land
510
On the Serpent destroyed by REGULUS 510 5 11
511
On the Growth of Cedars in England
512
Harmless Nature of HedgeHogs
516
Account of the Free Martin
517
Account of a Gigantic Child
519
143

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 138 - And desired of him letters to Damascus to the synagogues, that if he found any of this way, whether they were men or women, he might bring them bound unto Jerusalem.
Page 138 - And he trembling and astonished said, Lord, what wilt thou have me to do? And the Lord said unto him, Arise, and go into the city, and it shall be told thee what thou must do.
Page 497 - As he clothed himself with cursing like as with his garment, so let it come 'into his bowels like water, and like oil into his bones.
Page 302 - Under the opening eyelids of the Morn, We drove a-field, and both together heard What time the gray-fly winds her sultry horn...
Page 248 - ... a giant doth run his unwearied course, should as it were through a languishing faintness begin to stand and to rest himself; if the moon should wander from her beaten way, the times and seasons of the year blend themselves by disordered and confused mixture, the winds breathe out their last gasp, the clouds yield no rain, the earth be defeated of heavenly influence, the fruits of the earth pine away as children at the withered breasts of their mother no longer able to yield them relief; what...
Page 91 - For these two years hath the famine been in the land : and yet there are five years, in the which there shall neither be earing nor harvest.
Page 248 - ... should forget their wonted motions, and by irregular volubility turn themselves any way, as it might happen ; if the prince of the lights of heaven, which now, as a giant, doth run his unwearied course, should as it were, through a languishing faintness, begin to stand and to rest himself; if the moon should wander from her LESSONS BY THE WAY.
Page 93 - And the flax and the barley was smitten : for the barley was in the ear, and the flax was boiled. But the wheat and the rye were not smitten ; for they were not grown up.
Page 293 - On the other side; which, when the arch-felon saw, Due entrance he disdain'd ; and, in contempt, At one slight bound high overleap'd all bound Of hill or highest wall, and sheer within Lights on his feet. As when a prowling wolf, Whom hunger drives to seek new haunt for prey, Watching where shepherds pen their flocks at eve, In hurdled cotes amid the field secure, Leaps o'er the fence with ease into the fold...
Page 187 - O'er the dark trees a yellower verdure shed, And tip with silver every mountain's head; Then shine the vales, the rocks in prospect rise, A flood of glory bursts from all the skies : The conscious swains, rejoicing in the sight, Eye the blue vault, and bless the useful light.

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