Religion in Livy

Front Cover
BRILL, 1993 - 257 pages
This book examines the use that Livy made of religious topics, and shows how this fits in with other aspects of his narrative. The author shows how 'Livy's views of religion' depend less on personal belief than on the refinement of his narrative technique. He looks at the history decade by decade, and demonstrates that there are radical differences between different sections: in some Livy uses large-scale religious themes, but in others he deliberately avoids them. By a systematic analysis of Livy's narrative patterns and comparison with other ancient versions, it is proved that this is not simply due to subject-matter, but reflects a development in Livy's handling of his material. This profound difference between decades throws doubt on much of the standard picture of Livy: it also points to a need to revise notions of 'Augustan religious ideology'.
 

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Contents

The Third Decade
38
The Fourth Decade
78
The Fifth Decade
104
The Early Books
126
Book Five
175
The Second Pentad
204
Conclusion
241
Bibliography
249
Index 255
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About the author (1993)

D.S. Levene was educated at the City of London School and Brasenose College, Oxford. His publications include articles on Sallust and Tacitus; he is currently Junior Research Fellow at Brasenose College.