Select British Classics, Volume 5

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J. Conrad, 1803

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Page 280 - Retire with me, O rash unthinking mortal, from the vain allurements of a deceitful world, and learn that pleasure was not designed the portion of human life. Man was born to mourn and to be wretched ; this is the condition of all below the stars ; and whoever endeavours to oppose it acts in contradiction to the will of Heaven.
Page 56 - Evil into the mind of God or man May come and go, so unapproved, and leave No spot or blame behind...
Page 89 - Nothing is more unjust, however common, than to charge with hypocrisy him that expresses zeal for those virtues which he neglects to practise; since he may be sincerely convinced of the advantages of conquering his passions, without having yet obtained the victory...
Page 34 - ... to teach the means of avoiding the snares which are laid by Treachery for Innocence, without infusing any wish for that superiority with which the betrayer flatters his vanity ; to give the power of counteracting fraud, without the temptation to practise it ; to initiate youth by mock encounters in the art of necessary defence, and to increase prudence without impairing virtue.
Page 68 - From anger, in its full import, protracted into malevolence, and exerted in revenge, arise, indeed, many of the evils to which the life of man is exposed. By anger operating Upon power are produced the subversion of cities, the desolation of countries, the massacre of nations, and all those dreadful and astonishing calamities which fill the histories of the world, and which could not be read at any distant point of time, when the passions stand...
Page 247 - If a man was to compare the effect of a single stroke of the pick-axe, or of one impression of the spade, with the general design and last result, he would be overwhelmed by the sense of their disproportion ; yet those petty operations, incessantly continued, in time surmount the greatest difficulties, and mountains are levelled, and oceans bounded, by the slender force of human beings.
Page 25 - Some are too indolent to read any thing, till its reputation is established; others too envious to promote that fame, which gives them pain by its increase.
Page 60 - Who, when he saw the first sand or ashes, by a casual intenseness of heat, melted into a metalline form, rugged with excrescences, and clouded with impurities, would have imagined, that in this shapeless lump lay concealed so many conveniences of life, as would in time constitute a great part of the happiness of the world...
Page 221 - He whom the wantonness of abundance has once softened, easily sinks into neglect of his affairs ; and he that thinks he can afford to be negligent, is not far from being poor.
Page 282 - Yielding to immoral pleasure corrupts the mind, living to animal and trifling ones debases it ; both in their degree disqualify it for its genuine good, and consign it over to wretchedness. Whoever would be really happy, must make the diligent and regular exercise of his superior powers his chief attention, adoring the perfections of his Maker, expressing good-will to his fellow-creatures, cultivating inward rectitude.

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