Social Statics: Abridged and Revised; Together with The Man Versus the State

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D. Appleton, 1892 - 431 pages

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User Review  - wirkman - LibraryThing

This book is a handy, one-volume compilation of Herbert Spencer self-abridged "Social Statics" and his late-in-life volume of political essays, "The Man Versus the State." This is the one volume of ... Read full review

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Page 165 - Not to covet nor desire other men's goods ; but to learn and labour truly to get mine own living, and to do my duty in that state of life, unto which it shall please God to call me.
Page 55 - has freedom to do all that he wills, provided he infringes not the equal freedom of any other...
Page 378 - Hereby it is manifest, that during the time men live without a common power to keep them all in awe, they are in that condition which is called war, and such a war as is of every man against every man.
Page 96 - Act" (9th of George I.), which declares that any one disguised and in possession of an offensive weapon " appearing in any warren, or place where hares or conies have been, or shall be usually kept, and being thereof duly convicted, shall be adjudged guilty of felony, and shall suffer death, as in cases of felony, without benefit of clergy.
Page 62 - Though the earth and all inferior creatures be common to all men, yet every man has a property in his own person. This nobody has any right to but himself. The labour of his body, and the work of his hands, we may say, are properly his.
Page 46 - A state also of equality, wherein all the power and jurisdiction is reciprocal, no one having more than another; there being nothing more evident than that creatures of the same species and rank, promiscuously born to all the same advantages of nature, and the use of the same faculties, should also be equal one amongst another without subordination or subjection...
Page 62 - The labour of his body and the work of his hands, we may say, are properly his. Whatsoever, then, he removes out of the state that nature hath provided and left it in, he hath mixed his labour with it, and joined to it something that is his own, and thereby makes it his property.
Page 379 - Therefore, before the names of just and unjust can have place, there must be some coercive power to compel men equally to the performance of their covenants, by the terror of some punishment greater than the benefit they expect by the breach of their covenant...
Page 379 - For where no covenant hath preceded, there hath no right been transferred, and every man has right to every thing; and consequently, no action can be unjust. But when a covenant is made, then to break it is unjust: and the definition of INJUSTICE is no other than the not performance of covenant. And whatsoever is not unjust, is just.
Page 190 - ... and means whatsoever, all and every such person or persons as shall, at any time hereafter, attempt or enterprise the destruction, invasion, detriment, or annoyance of the...

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