Popular Traditions of Glasgow: Historical, Legendary and Biographical

Front Cover
Andrew Wallace
Morison, 1889 - 272 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 92 - The eclipse of Nature spreads my pall, The majesty of darkness shall Receive my parting ghost ! This spirit shall return to Him That gave its heavenly spark; Yet think not, Sun, it shall be dim When thou thyself art dark! No ! it shall live again, and shine In bliss unknown to beams of thine, By him recall'd to breath, Who captive led captivity, Who robb'd the grave of Victory, And took the sting from Death...
Page 41 - Come then, my friend ! my genius ! come along ! Oh master of the poet, and the song ! And while the Muse now stoops, or now ascends, To man's low passions, or their glorious ends, Teach me, like thee, in various nature wise, To fall with dignity, with temper rise; Form'd by thy converse, happily to steer, From grave to gay, from lively to severe ; Correct with spirit, eloquent with ease, Intent to reason, or polite to please.
Page 133 - Och! it hardens a' within, And petrifies the feeling! To catch dame Fortune's golden smile, Assiduous wait upon her; And gather gear by ev'ry wile That's justified by honour; Not for to hide it in a hedge, Nor for a train attendant; But for the glorious privilege Of being independent. The fear o...
Page 77 - The outward shows of sky and earth, Of hill and valley, he has viewed ; And impulses of deeper birth Have come to him in solitude. In common things that round us lie Some random truths he can impart, The harvest of a quiet eye That broods and sleeps on his own heart.
Page 234 - JOHN ANDERSON MY JO. JOHN ANDERSON my jo, John, When we were first acquent. Your locks were like the raven, Your bonie brow was brent; But now your brow is beld, John, Your locks are like the snaw ; But blessings on your frosty pow, John Anderson my jo. John Anderson my jo, John, We clamb the hill thegither; And monie a canty day, John, We've had wi...
Page 74 - The VOYAGE and SHIPWRECK of ST, PAUL; with Dissertations on the Life and Writings of St. Luke and the Ships and Navigation of the Ancients.
Page 123 - Tell me you must and shall Say why bare-headed you are come, Or why you come at all ? Now Gilpin had a pleasant wit, And loved a timely joke!
Page 6 - Scrape is a skilful author as well as an experienced angler. It does not fall to the lot of all men to handle with equal dexterity, the brush, the pen, and the rod, to say nothing of the rifle, still less of the leister under cloud of night.
Page 186 - Being at table with his usual fare, some bread, a few prunes, and a measured quantity of milk diluted with water, and having the cup in his hand, when the last stroke of...
Page 204 - God" which Mr. Irving lately published, and we apprehend there can be no comparison as to their success. The first ran like wild-fire through the country, were the darlings of watering-places, were laid in the windows of inns,* and were to be met with in all places of public resort ; while the " Orations" get on but slowly, on Milton's stilts, and > are pompously announced as in a Third Edition.

Bibliographic information