Leigh's guide to Wales & Monmouthshire

Front Cover
Leigh and Son, 1835 - 364 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 19 - Whilst summer lasts, and I live here, Fidele, I'll sweeten thy sad grave: Thou shalt not lack The flower, that's like thy face, pale primrose; nor The azur'd hare-bell, like thy veins; no, nor The leaf of eglantine, whom not to slander, Out-sweeten'd not thy breath...
Page 182 - The largest of the above said islands is about a mile in length, and half a mile in breadth ; and...
Page 145 - With the woman one loves, with the friend of one's heart, and a good ftudy of books, one might pals an age there, and think it a day.
Page 228 - Beneath the Suspension Bridge across the Menai Strait in Wales, close to one of the main piers, is a remarkably fine echo. The sound of a blow on the pier with a hammer is returned in succession from each of the...
Page 330 - How many hearts have here grown cold, That sleep these mouldering stones among ; How many beads have here been told, . How many matins here been sung. " On this rude stone, by time long broke, I think I see some pilgrim kneel ; I think I see the censor smoke ; I think I hear the solemn peal.
Page 345 - After sailing four Miles from Ross, we came to Goodrich-castle, where a very grand view presented itself; and we rested on our oars to examine it. A reach of the river, forming a noble bay, is spread before the eye. The bank, on the right, is steep, and covered with wood; beyond which a bold promontory shoots out, crowned with a castle, rising among the trees.
Page 315 - Anglesea, with woods, lakes, and glens, scattered in magnificient confusion. A scene like this commands our feelings to echo, as it were, in unison to its grandeur and sublimity; the thrill of astonishment and the transport of admiration seem to contend for the mastery ; and nerves are touched that never thrilled before ! We seem as if our former existence were annihilated ; and as if a new epoch were commenced. Another world opens upon us; and an unlimited orbit appears to display itself, as a theatre...
Page 115 - Often have these walls Echoed his footsteps, as with even tread He paced around his prison : not to him Did Nature's fair varieties exist ; He never saw the sun's delightful beams, Save when through yon high bars he pour'da sad And broken splendour.
Page 117 - M y time was spent in serving you and you, A nd death's my pay, it seems, and welcome too ; R evenge destroying but itself, while I T o birds of prey leave my old cage and fly ; E xamples preach to the eye care then (mine says), N ot how you end, but how you spend your days.
Page 329 - ... the rest, each reduced now to a narrow rim of stone, but completely preserving its form. The shapes even of the windows are little altered, but some of them are quite obscured, others partially shaded by tufts of ivy...

Bibliographic information