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EIAN

29 JAN 1964 TO HIS EXCELLENCY

THE MOST NOBLE

FRANCIS, MARQUIS OF HASTINGS, K. G.

Governor-General and Commander-in

Chief of British India ; &c. &c. &c.

THESE ESSAYS

ARE RESPECTFULLY INSCRIBED

BY HIS LORDSHIP'S

MOST OBEDIENT AND

MOST HUMBLE SERVANT,

G. YOUNG,

A

PREFACE.,

.

THE following essays are the fruit of the abundant leisure I have enjoyed in this country. In each of them an attempt is made to decide some controverted question or questions of permanent interest. With respect to my manner of treating the several subjects, I request the reader's attention to the opening of Mr. Burke's Fourth Letter on a Regicide Peace.

“ I am not sure,” says that incomparable writer, “that the best way of “ discussing any subject, except those that con

cern the abstract sciences, is not somewhat in “ the way of dialogue. To this mode, however, “ there are two objections; the first, that it hap

pens, as in the puppet-show, one man speaks for “ all the personages. An unnatural uniformity of tone is in a manner unavoidable. The other, " and more serious objection is, that as the author

(if not an absolute sceptick) must have some “ opinion of his own to enforce, he will be conti

nually tempted to enervate the arguments he “ puts into the mouth of his adversary, or to place “ them in a point of view most commodious for

a

“ their refutation. There is, however, a sort of “ dialogue not quite so liable to these objections, “ because it approaches more nearly to truth and

nature: it is called CONTROVERSY. Here the parties speak for themselves. If the writer, who attacks another's notions, does not deal

fairly with his adversary, the diligent reader has " it always in his power, by resorting to the work “ examined, to do justice to the original author “ and to himself.” To be sure of doing justice to the statement of my adversary's opinions, and to adhere more closely to the nature of dialogue, I believe I have, on every occasion, quoted his own words.

The restoration of the balance of power in Europe after the second expulsion of Bonaparte, appeared to me to confer a new interest on the facts and principles contained in the Politique de tous les Cabinets. While the fairest portion of the world continued to be vexed and oppressed under the domination of a man who had a heart to conceive, a head to contrive, and millions of hands to execute every deed of mischief; and even during the long dawn which ushered in the splendour of a happier day than

preceded the late reign of gloom and terror; all ideas pf balance--freedom--and independence, could only refer to ardent and just hopes, the rewards of a righteous cause; not to substantial realities and actual enjoyments.

any which

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