The Quarterly Review

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William Gifford, Sir John Taylor Coleridge, John Gibson Lockhart, Whitwell Elwin, William Macpherson, William Smith, Sir John Murray (IV), Rowland Edmund Prothero (Baron Ernle)
John Murray, 1830
 

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Page 492 - He that is down needs fear no fall, He that is low, no pride; He that is humble ever shall Have God to be his guide.
Page 213 - Ye hypocrites, ye can discern the face of the sky and of the earth; but how is it that ye do not discern this time? 57 Yea, and why even of yourselves judge ye not what is right?
Page 196 - And a certain woman named Lydia, a seller of purple, of the city of Thyatira, which worshipped God, heard us: whose heart the Lord opened, that she attended unto the things which were spoken of Paul.
Page 11 - And Elijah came unto all the people, and said, How long halt ye between two opinions ? if the Lord be God, follow him : but if Baal then follow him.
Page 77 - The Moorish cavaliers gazed with a silent agony of tenderness and grief upon that delicious abode, the scene of their loves and pleasures. While they yet looked, a light cloud of smoke burst forth from the citadel, and presently a peal of artillery, faintly heard, told that the city was taken possession of, and the throne of the Moslem kings was lost for ever.
Page 344 - Committee of the House of Commons, appointed to inquire into the Bankrupt Laws ; and i This and the two preceding motions were lost by large majorities.
Page 212 - He should make us an offer thus large ; search all the .generations of men since the fall of our father Adam, find one man that hath done one action which hath passed from him pure, without any stain or blemish at all...
Page 197 - Origen* has with singular sagacity observed, that he who believes the Scripture to have proceeded from him who is the Author of Nature, may well expect to find the same sort of difficulties in it, as are found in the constitution of Nature.
Page 491 - A man i' the clouds, and hear him speak to thee ? Wouldst thou be in a dream, and yet not sleep ? Or wouldst thou in a moment laugh and weep ? Wouldest thou lose thyself and catch no harm, And find thyself again without a charm ? Wouldst read thyself, and read thou know'st not what, And yet know whether thou art blest or not, By reading the same lines ? O then come hither, And lay my book, thy head, and heart together.

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