Amadis of Gaul, Volume 1

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J. R. Smith, 1872 - 292 pages
 

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Page xxi - Enchanted weapons, may be traced to the workshop of Vulcan as easily as to the Dwarfs of Scandinavia. The tales of dragons may be originally oriental; but the adventures of Jason and Hercules, were popular tales in Europe, long before the supposed migration of Odin, or the birth of Mohammed. If magical rings were invented in Asia, it was Herodotus, who introduced the fashion into Europe. The Fairies and Ladies of the Lake, bear a closer resemblance to the Nymphs and Naiads of Rome and Greece, than...
Page 29 - He took the presents, and laid the ring and the wax in his lap, while he unrolled the sword from a linen cloth in which it was wrapt, wondering that it should be without a scabbard. Meantime Oriana took up the wax, and said. I will have this...
Page 64 - Giant had earned away his brother Galaor, he determined to seek him, and recover him by force of arms or otherwise. When the cortes was ended, he requested his father permission to go to Great Britain. Much did the King and Queen labour to detain him, but it might not be by reason of the love he bare, which made him obedient to none but his Lady. So he clad himself in armour like that which Abies had destroyed in the combat, and taking none with him but Gandalin set forth. They proceeded till they...
Page xiv - I have ended here, and left the reader to infer that Amadis and Oriana, like the heroes of every nursery tale, lived very happy after. The chapters which follow in the Spanish are evidently added to introduce the fifth book, or what Montalvo, in something like a Quack's Greek, calls the Sergas of Esplandian. It is one Romance growing out of another as clumsily as a young oyster upon the back of its parent.
Page xxv - D'Herberay, or obsolete in his time, is accordingly omitted,, and all the foolish anachronisms and abominable obscenities of the Frenchman are retained. I kept my eye upon it as I proceeded, for the purpose of preserving its language where it was possible. A modern style would have altered the character of the book ; as far as was in my power I have avoided that fault, not by intermixing obsolete words, but by rendering the original structure of sentence as literally as was convenient, and by rejecting...
Page viii - Briojania's desires he remained, losing both his appetite, and, his sleep, 'till his life was in great danger. This being known in the court of King Lisuarte, his Lady Oriana, that she might not lose him, sent and commanded him to grant the Damsel's desire, and he having this command, and considering that by no other means could he recover his liberty or keep his word, took that fair Queen for his Leman, and had by her a son and a daughter at one birth. But it was not so, unless Briolania seeing...
Page 118 - ... then followed that stroke with such another, that he never needed a surgeon. Then sheathing his sword, he recovered the hatchet from the shield, and so played his part with the other five, that only two escaped death by falling at his feet for mercy. Shew me then the prisoners ! said Amadis : they led the way. Who lies here 1 said he, hearing a lamentable voice from a cell.
Page 33 - Knight ; and she showed him to Perion, kneeling before the altar. The King saw him how fair he was, and approaching him, said, would you receive the order of Knighthood ? — I would. — In the name of God, then ! and may He order it that it be well bestowed on you, and that you may grow in honour as you have in person. Then, putting on the right spur, he said, now are you a Knight, and may receive the sword. The King took the sword, and gave it to him, and the Child girded it on. Then...
Page 256 - ... enamoured, but we should keep our cousin company who is, and whose heart is so bold. Thereto they all consented, and set forth with the Damsel. What is this island ? said Florestan to Amadis, tell me, Sir, for you seem to know. A young Knight whom I greatly esteem, replied Amadis, told me all I know ; King Arban of North Wales : he was there four days, but could accomplish none of the adventures, and so departed with shame. The Damsel then related the history of the enchantments, which greatly...
Page 257 - Then he beheld the two uppermost ; the lower bore, in a field azure, a Knight cutting off the head of a Giant; this •was the shield of King Abies of Ireland, who had been there two years before his combat with Amadis : the highest had three golden flowers in a field azure : this he knew not, but he read the inscription. This is the shield of Don Quadragante, brother to King Abies of Ireland. He had proved the adventure twelve days ago, and had reached the marble perron, which was more than any...

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