Taken for Granted: The Future of U.S.-British Relations

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 1998 - 163 pages

Veteran journalist and communications scholar Philip Seib examines the future of Anglo-American relations in the context of post-Cold War developments such as the restructuring of NATO and the growing importance of the European Union. After establishing the historical context of ties between the United States and Great Britain, Seib analyzes current and prospective security and economic issues, cultural links between the two countries, and the dynamics of bilateral cooperation in matters such as building peace in Northern Ireland. Professor Seib also suggests an agenda for strengthening these ties as the new millennium begins.

Relations between the United States and Great Britain remain good, but neglect--even during stable periods--could undermine this relationship. Seib makes the case that the United States and Great Britain still need each other and would benefit from constructive reappraisal and reaffirmation of their friendship. Although much has been written about the history of the special relationship, Seib provides uniquely comprehensive analysis of the issues that will determine the future of this alliance. The book will be of considerable use to scholars, students, policymakers, and all who believe that the future of US-British relations is too important to be taken for granted.

 

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Contents

THE SPECIAL RELATIONSHIP
1
DEFENDERS OF THE FAITH
25
DOLLARS AND POUNDS
55
BEYOND MASTERPIECE THEATRE
79
GETTING ALONG
93
THE NEW CENTURY
121
NOTES
139
BIBLIOGRAPHY
151
INDEX
159
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About the author (1998)

PHILIP SEIB is Professor of Journalism at Southern Methodist University and a veteran television and newspaper journalist. He is the author of nine books, most recently, Headline Diplomacy: How News Coverage Affects Foreign Policy (Praeger, 1996).

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