The Edinburgh Review, Volume 41; Volume 75

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A. and C. Black, 1842
 

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Page 170 - But, gracious God, how well dost Thou provide For erring judgments an unerring guide ! Thy throne is darkness in the abyss of light, A blaze of glory that forbids the sight. O teach me to believe Thee thus concealed, And search no farther than Thyself revealed ; But her alone for my director take, Whom Thou hast promised never to forsake...
Page 167 - Now high, now low, now master up, now miss, And he himself one vile antithesis. Amphibious thing ! that acting either part, The trifling head, or the corrupted heart ; Fop at the toilet, flatterer at the board, Now trips a lady, and now struts a lord.
Page 437 - Bellassis so much that it is feared he will die: and, finding himself severely wounded, he called to Tom Porter, and kissed him, and bade him shift for himself; 'for...
Page 230 - The evils produced by his wickedness were felt in lands where the name of Prussia was unknown ; and in order that he might rob a neighbour whom he had promised to defend, black men fought on the coast of Coromandel, and red men scalped each other by the Great Lakes of North America.
Page 230 - On the head of Frederic is all the blood which was shed in a war which raged during many years and in every quarter of the globe, the blood of the column of Fontenoy, the blood of the mountaineers who were slaughtered at Culloden.
Page 167 - Whose buzz the witty and the fair annoys, Yet wit ne'er tastes, and beauty ne'er enjoys: So well-bred spaniels civilly delight In mumbling of the game they dare not bite. Eternal smiles his emptiness betray, As shallow streams run dimpling all the way.
Page 170 - Above it stood the Seraphims: each one had six wings; with twain he covered his face, and with twain he covered his feet, and with twain he did fly.
Page 452 - THERE is a bird, who by his coat, And by the hoarseness of his note, Might be supposed a crow; A great frequenter of the church, Where bishoplike he finds a perch, And dormitory too. Above the steeple shines a plate, That turns and turns, to indicate From what point blows the weather. Look upó your brains begin to swim, 'Tis in the cloudsó that pleases him, He chooses it the rather.
Page 176 - For mine is the lay that lightly floats, And mine are the murmuring, dying notes, That fall as soft as the snow on the sea, And melt in the heart as instantly ! And the passionate strain that, deeply going. Refines the bosom it trembles through, As the musk-wind, over the water blowing, Ruffles the wave but sweetens it too...
Page 240 - One bookseller sent to the palace a copy of the most stinging lampoon that perhaps was ever written in the world, the Memoirs of Voltaire, published by Beaumarchais, and asked for his majesty's orders. " Do not advertise it in an offensive manner," said the King, " but sell it by all means. I hope it will pay you well.

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