Valley of the Nile: Its Tombs, Temples and Monuments

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T. Nelson & Sons, 1867 - 224 pages
 

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Page 108 - I met a traveller from an antique land Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert . . . Near them, on the sand, Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown, And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed: And on the pedestal these words appear: 'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!
Page 60 - Laugh and mock if you will at the worship of stone idols, but mark ye this, ye breakers of images, that in one regard, the stone idol bears awful semblance of Deity unchangefulness in the midst of change the same seeming will, and intent for ever and ever inexorable ! Upon ancient dynasties of Ethiopian and Egyptian Kings upon Greek and Roman, upon Arab and Ottoman conquerors upon Napoleon dreaming of an Eastern Empire upon battle and pestilence upon the ceaseless misery of...
Page 101 - But thou art cast out of thy grave like an abominable branch, and as the raiment of those that are slain, thrust through with a sword, that go down to the stones of the pit; as a carcase trodden under feet.
Page 108 - ... whose frown, And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed : And on the pedestal these words appear : 'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair !
Page 119 - Yet I doubt not through the ages one increasing purpose runs, And the thoughts of men are widened with the process of the suns.
Page 58 - Comely the creature is, but the comeliness is not of this world ; the once worshipped beast is a deformity and a monster to this generation, and yet you can see that those lips, so thick and heavy, were fashioned according to some ancient mould of beauty...
Page 69 - Westward the course of empire takes its way ; The four first acts already past, A fifth shall close the drama with the day ; Time's noblest offspring is the last.
Page 60 - Islam wither away ; and the Englishman, straining far over to hold his loved India, will plant a firm foot on the banks of the Nile, and sit in the seats of the Faithful...
Page 83 - High towers, faire temples, goodly theaters, Strong walls, rich porches, princelie pallaces, Large streetes. brave houses, sacred sepulchers, Sure gates, sweete gardens, stately galleries, Wrought with faire pillours and fine imageries; All those (0 pitie!) now are turnd to dust, And overgrowne with black oblivions rust.
Page 171 - God was displeased with us, and there came up from the East, in a strange manner, men of an ignoble race, who had the confidence to invade our country, and easily subdued it by their power, without any battle.

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