The Letters of Horace Walpole: Earl of Orford: Including Numerous Letters Now First Published from the Original Manuscripts ...

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Lea and Blanchard, 1842

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Contents

CHAPTER VIII
101
EXTRACTS FROM THE LETTERS OF SARAH DUCHESS OF MARLBOROUGH TO
111
LETTERS OF HORACE WALPOLE
121
masquerade 221
125
To Richard West Esg Aug 17 Gray and other schoolfellows Eton recol
127
To George Montagu Esq March 20 French and English manners con
128
To the same June 18 Rheims Brookes Gustavus Vasa
134
To the same Bologna Letterwriting Curl Whitfields Journal Jingling
140
Inscription Entrance to Rome
146
The Conclave Antiquities of Rome State
152
To Richard West Esq Medals and inscriptions Taking of Porto Bello
159
To the same Nov Disastrous flood at Florence
166
To the Rev Joseph Spence Feb 21 Hopes to renew in England an
168
To the same Oct Corsica Bianca Colonna Baron Stosch and his Mal
174
To the saine Nov 2 Sir Thomas Robinsons ball The Euston embroil
182
To the same Nov 23 Spanish design on Lombardy Sir Edward Wal 66
189
To the same Feb 25 House of Commons Shippen Murray Story
196
To the same Dec 16 Chairman of election committees Ministry in
197
To the same Dec 29 The Dominichino Passage of the Giogo Bubb
206
To the same Jan 22 House of Commons Merchants petition Leonidas
218
To the same March 3 Merchants petition Leonidas Glover New Story
229
To the same March 22 Queen of Hungarys successes Lord Oxfords
237
against him Place Bill rejected by the Lords
243
To the same April 29 Preparations for war in Flanders Examinations
249
To the same May 26 Ranelagh Vauxhall The Opera Mrs Clive
256
To the same Sune 25 Successes of the Queen of Hungary Mr Pulteney
263
To the same Lines on the death of Richard West Esq A Receipt
270
To the same July 7 New Place Bill General Guise Monticelli
271
To the same July 29 About to set out for Houghton Evening at Rane
278
To the same Sept 11 Visit to Woolterton A Catalague of New French
284
To the same Oct 16 Admiral Matthews Yarmouth Roads A ballad
290
To the same Nov 15 Projects of Opposition Lord Orfords reception at
296
Lord Orford 359 To the same Feb 23 Welsh election carried against Sir Watkyn Williams
361
To the same March 5 Great storm French transports destroyed
363
To the same May 8 Debate on the Pretenders Correspondence Bill
369
To the Hon H S Conway June 29 Eton recollections Lines out of a new 7
375
To Sir Horace Mann July 22 Letterwriting one of the first duties Diffi
381
To the same Sept 1 Victory at Velletri Iness of the King of France
387
To the same November 9 Lord Middletons wedding The Pomfrets
393
blies Marshal Belleisle a prisoner at Hanover
399
To the same April 15 Reflections on his fathers death Compliments paid
410
To George Montagu Esq May 25 Family at Englefield Green Sir
416
To the Hon H S Conway July 1 Tournai and Fontenoy Gaming act
422
To George Montagu Esq July 13 Success of the French in Flanders Lord
428
To the Rev Thomas Birch Aug 15 Respecting a projected History
434
To the same Sept 13 Progress of the rebellion The Duke of Newcastles
437
To the same Oct 4 Operations against the rebels Spirited conduct of
443
To the same Nov 15 Disturbance about the new regiments Advance
449
To the same Dec 9 Conduct of the rebels at Derby Black Friday Pre
455
To the same Jan 17 The rebels fortifying themselves in Scotland
461
To the same March 6 Reunion of the dispersed clans Lord Lovat
469
To the same April 25 Battle of Culloden Escape of
476
To George Montagu Esq June 12 Anecdotes of the Prince of Hesse
483
To the same Sept 15 Lady Orford and Mr Shirley
504
78
517
To Sir Horace Mann June 26Election tumults Sir Jacob Bouveries
531
To George Montagu Esq Oct 1 Cardinal Polignacs AntiLucretius
537
To the same Feb 16 Resignation of Lord Chesterfield Ministerial
544
To the same May 26 Ranelagh Anecdotes Sir Thomas Bootle Story
551
To the same Aug 11 Anecdotes of the House of Vere Kitty Clive Gar
558
To Sir Horace Mann Sept 12Death of Bishop Gibson
565
Character of Lord Walpole Unpopularity of the peace Death of
569
63

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Page 196 - I remember an instance : when I published the Plan for my Dictionary, Lord Chesterfield told me that the word great should be pronounced so as to rhyme to state ; and Sir William Yonge sent me word that it should be pronounced so as to rhyme to seat, and that none but an Irishman would pronounce it grait l.
Page 173 - On! on! through meadows, managed like a garden, A paradise of hops and high production ; For, after years of travel by a bard in Countries of greater heat, but lesser suction, A green field is a sight which makes him pardon The absence of that more sublime construction, Which mixes up vines — olives — precipices — Glaciers— volcanoes — oranges and ices.
Page 52 - You perceive by my date that I am got into a new camp, and have left my tub at Windsor. It is a little play-thinghouse that I got out of Mrs. Chenevix's shop, and is the prettiest bauble you ever saw. It is set in enamelled meadows, with filigree hedges : A small Euphrates through the piece is roll'd, And little finches wave their wings in gold.
Page 503 - ... arm, as if he were giving the signal for battle. He received three blows, but the first certainly took away all sensation. He was not a quarter of an hour on the scaffold ; Lord Kilmarnock above half a one. Balmerino certainly died with the intrepidity of a hero, but with the insensibility of one too. As he walked from his prison to execution, seeing every window and top of house filled with spectators, he cried out, 'Look, look, how they are all piled up like rotten oranges!
Page 408 - He exercis'd his troops, the signal given, Flew off at once with his Numidian horse To the south gate, where Marcus holds the watch. I saw, and call'd to stop him, but in vain, He toss'd his arm aloft, and proudly told me He would not stay and perish like Sempronius.
Page 491 - Balmerino asked the bystanders who this person was ? and being told, he said, " Oh, Mr. Murray ! I am extremely glad to see you ; I have been with several of your relations ; the good lady, your mother, was of great use to us at Perth.
Page 313 - But yesterday was the greatest stroke of all! She made her ladies vow to her, that if she should lie senseless, they would not sit down in the room before she was dead.
Page 56 - Romanorum," the author of the Mysterious Mother, a tragedy of the highest order, and not a puling love-play. He is the father of the first romance, and of the last tragedy in our language, and surely worthy of a higher place than any living writer, be he who he may.
Page 499 - Heaven ! of woes like ours, And let us, let us weep no more." The dismal scene was o'er and past, The lover's mournful hearse retired The maid drew back her languid head, And, sighing forth his name, expired.
Page 490 - Lord Kilmarnock and Lord Cromartie are both past forty, but look younger. Lord Kilmarnock is tall and slender, with an extreme fine person : his behaviour a most just mixture between dignity and submission ; if in anything to be reprehended, a little affected, and his hair too exactly dressed for a man in his situation ; but when I say this, it is not to find fault with him, but to show how little fault there was to be found.

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