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PUBLISHED BY DUTTON AND WENTWORTH,

FOR THE ASSOCIATION.

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Boston, September 23, 1837. DEAR SIR,

The undersigned, in behalf of the Executive Committee of the Board of Managers of the Exhibition and Fair of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association, have been charged with the pleasant duty of soliciting of your Excellency, for the press, a copy of your highly appropriate and eloquent address, delivered before the Institution on the evening of the 20th instant. Believing that the publication of it will be of great public utility, and gratifying to every member of the Association, we feel the strongest assurance that you will accede to the wish of the committee.

With the highest consideration,
We are, most respectfully,
Your obedient servants,

STEPHEN FAIRBANKS,
JAMES L. HOMER,

JAMES CLARK.
To His Excellency EDWARD EVERETT.

Boston, 29th September, 1837. GENTLEMEN,

I am duly favored with yours of the 25th, and in compliance with the request of the Executive Committee of the Managers of the Exhibition and Fair of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association, I have the honor to submit to you, for publication, my address of the 20th instant. It is scarcely necessary to observe, that it is by no means to be considered as a philosophical treatise, exhausting the subject, and worthy the notice of the student, but as a series of reflections and illustrations, of a somewhat desultory character, designed for delivery before a popular audience, and hastily thrown together amidst numerous pressing avocations.

I am, gentlemen, with high respect,

Your friend and servant,

EDWARD EVERETT. Messrs. STEPHEN FAIRBANKS,

JAMES L. HOMER,
JAMES CLARK.

ADDRESS.

MR. PRESIDENT AND GENTLEMEN,

I beg leave to congratulate you on the success of your efforts to establish the first fair of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association. Under circumstances somewhat unfavorable, you have produced an exhibition which, I am persuaded, has fully answered the public expectation. More than fifteen thousand articles, in almost every department of art, have been displayed in the halls. Specimens of machinery and fabrics, reflecting great credit on their inventors, improvers, and manufacturers, many of them affording promise of the highest utility, and unitedly bearing a very satisfactory testimony to the state of the arts in this country, and particularly in this community, have been submitted to the public inspection. The exhibitors have already, in the aggregate, been rewarded with the general approbation of the crowds of our fellowcitizens, who have witnessed the display. It will be the business of your committees, after a critical examination of the articles exhibited, to award enduring testimonials of merit. But the best reward will be the consciousness of having contributed to the common stock of the public welfare, by the successful cultivation of the arts so important to the improvement of society and the happiness of life.

I feel gratified at being invited to act as the organ of your Association, in this general expression of its sentiments, on so

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