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Shakespeare, Richard, 28, 322.
Shakespeare, Susannah, first child
of William, 68, 71, 318, 319,
322; marriage of, 318; verse
written of, 318.
Shakespeare, William, develop-
ment of the English drama
before his time, 14-24; the dra-
matic form all but perfected by
his forerunners, 21; his imme-
diate predecessors and older
contemporaries, 22, 120, 181;
his birth and birthplace, 26-30;
at four years old, 32; his formal
education, 35-41; after leaving
school, 41, 59; our knowledge
of his life, 60, 62; characteris-
tics of his youth, 62, 63; his
departure from Stratford, 63,
70; his marriage and marriage
bond, 66-69; his children, 66,
68, 71, 204, 205, 207, 317-320;
his journey to London, 71, 72;
his arrival, 73; early association
with theatres a matter of tradi-
tion, 79; joins Lord Leicester's
Players, 83; in the company of
"Lord Chamberlain's Men,"
as actor and manager, 90-91;
tours of his company, 91; his
knowledge of Italy, 92-95; or-
der of composition of his plays,
112; his versification, 112;
earliest touches of his hand,
113-114; his first play in print,
115; his part in "Henry VI.,"
118, 120; attacked by Greene,
121-124; "Love's Labour's
Lost," 125-133; "The Comedy
of Errors," 133-135; "The Two
Gentlemen of Verona," 136-
137; the poetic period, 138-
179; stages of his poetic growth,
143; the publication of "Venus

"

and Adonis," 146, 153; of“ The
Rape of Lucrece," 150-152;
culmination of the lyrical period,
156; "Romeo and Juliet," 156-
159; "A Midsummer Night's
Dream," 159-161; the Sonnets,
162-178; "The Rape of Lu-
crece," 177; "A Lover's Com-
plaint," 177, 178; "The Phoenix
and the Turtle," 178; "The
Passionate Pilgrim," 179; the
Histories, 188-196; the Come-
dies, 197-203, 208-215; his
return to Warwickshire, 204,
232, 315; the purchase of New
Place by, 204, 293; its restora-
tion, 206, 207, 293; the ap-
proach of tragedy, 216-231;
portraits of, 217, 323-325; social
disposition of, 218; the "War
of the Theatres," 221-223, 248;
the earlier Tragedies, 232-252;
the later Tragedies, 253-275;
ethical significance of the Trag-
edies, 276-391; his view of
man's place in nature, 279; his
study of character in the Trag-
edies, 280-282; as a poet, 282-
284; the Tragedies the highest
point of his art, 284; his ethi-
cal view of life, 286; his rela-
tions to the Puritan party, 286,
320; his largeness of view, 289-
291; the Romances: "Pericles,"
294, 295; Cymbeline," 295;
"The Winter's Tale," 301-304;
"The Tempest," 306-310; his
greatness as a poet, 305; his
share in "Henry VIII.," 312;
attitude toward life of the Ro-
mances, 314; his last years in
Stratford, 315; his income, 315;
his general circumstances, 316,
317; his family, 318, 319; the

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spelling of his name, 319; his
religion unknown, 320; his will,
321-323; his death, 321; lines
over his grave, 321; the Strat-
ford bust and other portraits of,
323-325; the First Folio, 326,
327; his personal character,
327-330.

Shallow, Justice, 42, 53, 64, 65, 66.
Shaw, Julius, 206.
Shottery, 26, 48, 56, 66, 67.
Sidney, Sir Philip, his "Arcadia,"
and "Apologie for Poesie," 106,
181, 257; alluded to, 18, 212,
230, 320.

Sill, Mr., quoted, 190.
Snider, Denton, quoted, 276.
Somers, Sir George, and the Sea-
Venture, 307.

Sonnets, a favourite poetic form
in the closing decade of the six-
teenth century, 162, 163; intro-
duced from Italy by Surrey
and Wyatt, 164; their transla-
tions of Petrarch's, 164; other
collections of, 165; modern
sequences of, 166.

Sonnets of Shakespeare, the, 162;
published, 163; a sequence,
166; analysis of, 168; interpre-
tations of, 172-174; alluded to,
217, 278, 296, 328.
Sonneteers of Shakespeare's

time, 165.

thalamium," 181; alluded to,

230.

Still, John, 17.
St. Pancras, 75.

St. Paul's Cathedral, 73, 75.
St. Paul's Churchyard, 150.
Stratford-on-Avon, its charm, 25;
Shakespearean associations,25;
in 1564, 26; its population, 27;
Henley Street, 28-31; its love
of the drama, 33; the Gram-
mar School and Guild Chapel,
35, 57; the landscape between
Kenilworth and, 43, 46, 51; the
byways about, 47, 48; Warwick
from, 51; between Hampton
Lucy and, 55; events which
led to the poet's departure from,
63-66, 70; men from, among
Shakespeare's friends, 77, 78,
146; touches of, in the poems
or plays of Shakespeare, 145,
203; Shakespeare's return to,
204, 232, 315; his restoration
of New Place in, 205, 293;
later history of New Place, 205-
207, 317, 318, 322; the bust of
Shakespeare in the church at,
217; the poet's property at, 293,
317-319.
Stuart, Mary, 44.

Surrey, 93, 126, 164, 165.
Symonds, quoted, 122.

Southampton, Earl of. See Tableaux of New Testament

Wriothesley.

scenes in the fifth century, 7.
Talbot Inn, Chaucer's "Tabard,"
alluded to, 89.
Ten Brink, quoted, 298.
Thames, the principal thorough-
fare, 75.

"The Atheist's Tragedy," 102.
Theatre, the, 77, 79, 83, 89, 193;
the library of, 110, 115.

Spedding, Mr., 311, 312.
Spenser, Edmund, a well-known
name in Shakespeare's time,
107, 181; Shakespeare's love
of pastoral life shared by, 212,
213; his laxity in spelling of
names, even his own, 320; his
"Colin Clout," 181; his "Epi-

Theatre of Rome, 3; increasingly
vulgar as the populace sank, 5.
Theatres of London in Shake-
speare's time, 77, 83; their
character, 81, 87; opposition
of the Puritan element to, 82,
96; support of Queen Eliza-
beth, 82; arrangements of, 84-
86; costume and scenery, 86,
87; attendance on, 88; loca-
tion of, 98; opposition of the
City to, 100; of the Puritan
party, IOI.

"The Comedy of Errors," shows
some of the first touches of the
poet's hand, 113; first pub-
lished, 133; presented at Gray's
Inn, 133; sources of, 133; com-
parison with the play of Plautus,
135; moral sanity of, 135; hu-
mour of, 143; alluded to, 160,
198.

"The contention of the two
famous houses of York and
Lancaster," 20.

"The Duchess of Amalfi," 102.
"The Massacre at Paris," 23.
"The Merchant of Venice," evi-

dence of Shakespeare's foreign
travel, 94; produced about
1596, 200; sources of, 201;
modification of the original
material, 201; the poet's treat-
ment of the Jew in, 200-202.
"The Passionate Pilgrim," 106,
138, 179.

"The Phoenix and Turtle," 106,
138, 178.

"The Rape of Lucrece," 77, 106,

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"The Two Gentlemen of Verona,"
mistakes of locality in, 94;
shows some of the first touches
of the poet's hand, 113; sources
of, 136; slender in plot, 143;
in certain of its aspects of life
connected with "A Midsum-
mer Night's Dream," 160;
comedy form of, 198; alluded
to, 294.

"The Winter's Tale," flowers of
Warwickshire in, 49; alluded
to, 294; its freshness, 296;
sources of, 301, 302; produced
about 1611, 303; its popularity,
303; analysis of, 304; alluded
to, 314, 330.
"Titus Andronicus," included
among Shakespeare's plays,
113, 114, 115, 139, 142; a char-
acteristic Elizabethan play, 114;
analysis of, 139.
Tourneur, Cyril, alluded to, 93,

102.

Tower of London, the, 74.
Trade-guilds, centres of organized

presentation of Miracle plays, 9.

143, 150-155, 164, 176, 177.
"The Taming of the Shrew,"
allusions in, evidence of the
poet's foreign travel, 94; un-
mistakable references to War-

Tragedy, English, 23.
Tragedies of Shakespeare, the,
194, 197, 216, 221, 232, 252, 257,
292, 295-299, 315; "Julius

"

Cæsar," 233-240;
'Hamlet,"
240-249; "All's Well that Ends
Well," 250-252; "Measure for
Measure," 253, 254; "Troilus
and Cressida," 254-257;
"Othello," 259-261; 'Mac-
beth," 261-265; "King Lear,"
265-268; "Timon of Athens,"
268, 269; "Antony and Cleo-
patra," 270-272; " Coriolanus,"
273-275; ethical significance
of, 276-291; the highest point
of Shakespeare's art, 284; the
great insight of, due to Shake-
speare's largeness of view,
289.

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'Troilus and Cressida," sup-
posed to have had a part in
the "War of the Theatres,"
222; painful and repellent, 254;
belongs to the year 1603, 254;
sources, 255; analysis of, 254-
256; alluded to, 278.
"Twelfth Night," produced, 1601,
214; source of, 214, 215;
analysis of, 215; alluded to,

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294.

Twine, Lawrence, 294.

Udall, Nicholas, 16.

Vautrollier, Thomas, 77.
"Venus and Adonis," 77, 106,
143, 145-155.

Walker, William, godson of
Shakespeare, 323.

"War of the Theatres," the, 221,
223, 248, 256.
Warner, William, 134.
Warwick, the town of, 51.
Warwick Castle, 52.
Warwickshire landscape, the, 43,
46-58; Shakespeare's familiar-
ity with, 46, 48, 62, 207; in mid-
summer, 47; the footpaths in,
47, 48; touches of, in all Shake-
speare's work, 49; its special
charm, 50; along the Avon
below the bridge, 52; references
to, in "
Henry VI.," 190; in
"The Merry Wives of Wind-
sor" and "The Taming of the
Shrew," 203.
Webster, alluded to, 93, 102.
Weever, John, 154, 155.
Whitehall, the old Palace at, 215;
acting before the King at, 258,
265, 303.
Wilmcote, 28, 40.

Wilson, his "Cheerful Ayres and
Ballads," 310.

Wilton House, 257.

Wotton, on the Masque at Car-
dinal Wolsey's, 311.
Wriothesley, Henry, Earl of
Southampton, 146, 150, 176,
228-230, 232.
Wyatt, 93, 164, 165.

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