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line," 239; the spelling of his
name, 320; his Eulogy of
Shakespeare in the First Folio,
327; alluded to, 38, 181, 189,
304.

Jonson, Gerard, 217, 323.
"Julius Cæsar," criticised by
Jonson, 225; political situation
when it was written, 232;
source of, in Plutarch, 234;
modification of the original in,
235; publication of, 236; anal-
ysis of the play, 237, 239, 272;
preserved in the First Folio,
327.

Kempe, 222.
Kenilworth Castle, 42; the enter-
tainment of Queen Elizabeth
at, 42-43, 45; alluded to, 46,
51; Mervyn's Tower, 46; the
loveliness of its ruins, 48.

'King Johan," 20.

'King John," the prelude of the
historical plays, 182; com-
pleted about 1595, 184; a re-
cast, 184; has no hero, 185.
"King Lear," description of
Dover cliff in, 37; its land-
scape exceptional, 49; the
sublimest height of the poet's
tragic art, 265; performed be-
fore the King, 265; sources of,
265, 266; analysis of, 266, 267;
alluded to, 20, 261, 302.
King's servants, the, 257, 258.
Kyd, Thomas, one of Shake-

"

Jaggard, William, 178.
James I. on the growth of Lon-
don, 76; a patron of the stage,
257, 265; alluded to, 232.
Jew, the, in 1596, 201, 202.
Johnson, Robert, 310.
Jonson, Ben, ridiculed for includ-
ing plays among his "Works,"
109; prices paid for his plays,
109; his "Irene," 147; a con-
tributor to Chester's "Love's
Martyr," 178; a combatant in
the "War of the Theatres,"
221-222; a sketch of the life of,
223-226; his personal appear-
ance, 224; his character, 224-
225; his criticism of Shake-
speare's lack of scholarship,
225; his tribute to Shake-
speare, 226; the "Poetaster,"
227; his "Sejanus" and "Cati-

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speare's immediate predeces-
sors as a playwright, 21, 181;
his "Spanish Tragedy," 242.

Landor, Walter Savage, his "Ci-
tation and Examination of
William Shakespeare," 65.

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"Love's Labour's Won," men-
tioned by Meres, probably the
same as "All's Well that Ends
Well," 250.

Landscape, influence of, on the
verse of Scott, Burns, Words-
worth, 49; the Italian, 50.
Latin, Shakespeare's knowledge
of, 36, 37.

Lucy, Sir Peter, 64.

Law, Shakespeare's knowledge | Lucy, Sir Thomas, of Charlecote,

of, 38.

Lee, Sidney, on Shakespeare's
Sonnets, 172; on his acting |
before King James, 258; on
his expenditures, 317.
Leicester, the Earl of, his enter-
tainment of Queen Elizabeth,
42-43, 45, 48; his company of
players, 81-83, 88.
Leicester Hospital, 51.
Lodge, his death in 1625, 21; his
plays, 20; one of the group in
possession of the stage on the
arrival of Shakespeare, 21, 120,
181; his Rosalynde the
source of the plot of "As You
Like It," 212; his allusion to
an early Hamlet, 242; alluded
to, 121, 213.
London, Shakespeare's journey
to, 71; in the sixteenth century,
73; streets, 74; the city, 75;
its growth, 76; alluded to, 69,
125.

"

" Macbeth," contrast of landscape
in this and other plays, 49; con-
tains traces of the older drama,
114; sources of, 261; analysis
of, 262; parts of, said to be by
Middleton, 263; De Quincey
on the introduction of the
comic element, 263; Dr. For-
man's account of the perform-
ance of, in 1611, 264; unprinted
until in the First Folio, 327.
London Bridge, 74.
Magdalen College, Oxford, 125.
"Lord Chamberlain's Men," the, Malone, on the authorship of
90, 215.

"Love's Labour's Lost," the first
touches of the poet's hand
shown in, among others, 113;
betrays the influence of Lyly,
125, 130; played before the
Queen, 128; satirizes the times,
128, 143; betrays the youth of
the writer, 130; analysis of, 130-
133; three poems from, in
" The Passionate Pilgrim,"
179; alluded to, 160, 198.

42, 64, 65.

Lydgate, his Troy Book, 255.
Lyly, John, a sketch of, 125-127;
his influence on Shakespeare's
"Love's Labour's Lost," 125,
130, 139; one of the group in
possession of the stage on
Shakespeare's arrival in Lon-
don, 181; his "Euphues," 21,
106, 127.
Lyrical poetry, Shakespeare's
contribution to, 164.

"Henry VI.," 118.
Manningham, John, quoted, 214,

215.

Marlowe, Christopher, leader of
the group of men who con-
trolled the stage at the time of
Shakespeare's arrival in Lon-
don, 21, 107, 120, 181; a sketch
of, 23; his writings, 23; his
influence on English poetry,
104, 114; his death, 106; cred-
ited with part authorship of

"Henry VI.," 118; attacked | Mimes, or players, in the Middle

Ages, 4; condemned by the
Church, 5.

by Greene, 122, 123; his influ-
ence shown in some of Shake-
speare's plays, 124, 139, 183,
184, 200; identified by some
with the poet's "rival singer "
of the Sonnets, 170; the paral-
lelism between his "Edward
II." and Shakespeare's "Rich-
ard II.," 183; his "Dr. Faus-
tus," 23; his "Hero and Lean-
der," 149; his "Jew of Malta,"
200; his " Tamburlaine," 23,

Miracle play, 9; its realism, 10;
compared with the Moralities,
13; alluded to, 17.
"Mirrour of Magistrates," 19.
Moralities, the, 12; compared to
the Mystery and Miracle plays,
12; the important step in dra-
matic development marked by,
14; gradual transition to the
fully developed play from, 14.
More, Sir Thomas, 15.
"Much Ado About Nothing," the
perfection of witty dialogue and
repartee, 21; its contrast to
"The Merry Wives of Wind-
sor," 210; date and sources,

122, 123, 183.
Marston, 178, 181.
Mass, the, a dramatization of
certain fundamental ideas, 6;
of the central mystery of the
Christian faith, 7.
Masuccio, the story of Romeo

and Juliet sketched by, 157.
"Measure for Measure," Shake-
speare's modifications of the
story of, 253, 254; sources of,
254, 259; produced about 1603,
254.
Menæchmi of Plautus, the, prob-
able source of the plot of "The
Comedy of Errors," 134; said
to be like "Twelfth Night" by
John Manningham, 214.
Meredith, George, quoted on the
comic characters of Shake-
speare, 199.

Meres, Francis, on Shakespeare's
poetry, 154; his "Palladia Ta-
mia, 250; his mention of
"Love's Labour's Won," 250.
Mervyn's Tower, Kenilworth
Castle, 46.

Middle Ages, isolation of castles
and communities in the, 5.
Middleton, Thomas, 181, 263.
Milton, alluded to, 93.

211.

Mystery play, the, foreshadowed
in the fourth century Passion
play, 9; in the twelfth and thir-
teenth centuries, 9; its realism
in the fifteenth century, 10;
compared with the Moralities,
13; alluded to, 17.

Nash, Thomas, one of the play-
wrights controlling the stage
just before the arrival of Shake-
speare in London, 22, 181; his
character, 22, 120; addressed
by Greene in "A Groatsworth
of Wit," 121; drawn into the
"War of the Theatres" by
Greene, 123; his comment on
"Henry VI.," 119.
Nashe, Thomas, marries Eliza-
beth Hall, the granddaughter
of Shakespeare, 205, 322; his
wife, 205, 318.

New Place, Stratford, Shake-
speare's home in, 27, 72; the

purchase of, 204, 293; now a Personification inevitable to an

garden, 206; a commodious
building, 317.

North, Thomas, his translation
of Plutarch, 78, 117, 234.
Norton, collaborator with Sack-
ville in "Gorbordoc," 19.

imaginative race, 1-2.
Petrarch, the master of sonnet
form in Italy, 164; Surrey and
Wyatt's translations of sonnets
by, 164; Shakespeare's modi-
fication of the sonnet form used
by, 166.

Phillips, Augustus, 83, 90.
Plague, in London, 95.
Plautus, the source of the plot
of "The Comedy of Errors,"
134, 135, 214; Shakespeare's
acquaintance with, 36.
Player, the strolling, in the Middle
Ages, 5; condemned by the
Church, 6; his position in Eng-
land after the Conquest, 6; the
professional, created by the
Moralities, 14; in Shakespeare's
time, 32. See Actor.
Plays, in Shakespeare's time, 107;
frequently altered, 108; prop-
erty of the theatre, 107-109;
rarely published, 109.

"Passionate Pilgrim, The," pi-

ratical publication of Shake-
speare's poems in, 163, 179;
Shakespeare's name omitted
from the title-page of the second
edition of, 179.
Passion play, in the fourth cen- Plutarch, his influence on Shake-
tury, 8.

speare, 233, 305; North's trans-
lation of, 78, 117, 234; the story
of Timon from, 269; the story of
Antony from, 270; the story of
"Coriolanus" from, 273.
Poaching, Rowe's story of Shake-

speare's, 64.

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Old Clopton Bridge, 27, 32.
"Othello," mistakes in, 94; con-
tains traces of the older drama,
114; sources, 259; played be-
fore the king, 258; analysis of
characters, 259-261; the great
popularity of, 250.
Oxford, 71, 72.

Pageants, in the fifteenth century,

IO.

Pater, Mr., 126, 130.
Paynter, his "Palace of Fleas-
ure," 250, 269, 305.

Peele, one of the playwrights just
preceding Shakespeare on the
Elizabethan stage, 22, 120, 181;
his characteristics, 22; credited
with part authorship in " Henry
VI.," 118; addressed by Greene
in "A Groatsworth of Wit,"
121; Shakespeare drawn to,
139.

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Portraits of Shakespeare, 217,324-
326; the Stratford portrait, 31.
Puritan party, in opposition to
theatres, 82, 96, 100-103; Shake-
speare not a member of the,
287, 320.

Queen's Company of Players,
the, 32.
Quiney, Richard, 31, 207.
Quiney, Thomas, 31, 207, 319.

Re

Re

Raleigh, Sir Walter, 107, 127.
'Ralph Roister Doister," 16.
Ravenscroft, Edward, 113.
Register of the Stationers Com-
-pany, 61, 112, 200.
Religion in the fifteenth century,
II, 12.

Renaissance influence, the, at its
height in Shakespeare's time,
36; Italy the birthplace of, 92;
surprisingly wholesome con-
sidering the moral life of Italy
at the time, 102-103; made
Europe a community in intel-
lectual interests, 125; the sug-
gestiveness of, 141; freedom
secured by, 143, 144, 276, 287;
love of beauty a characteristic
of, 149, 276.

"Richard II.," published in 1597,
115; reflects the genius of
Marlowe, 124, 182, 183; revived
at the Globe, 229; its outline
taken from Holinshed, 235.
"Richard III.," published in 1597,
115; reflects the genius of
Marlowe, 124, 183; Holinshed
followed in, 183, 235.
Richardson, Locke, 39.
Robsart, Amy, imprisoned in

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analysis of, 157-159; affiliated
to "A Midsummer Night's
Dream" in lyric quality, 160;
alluded to, 260.

Rose, the, 89, 110, 156; produc-
tion of " Henry VI." at, 119, 193.
Rowe, his story of Shakespeare's
poaching, 63; quoted again,
79, 90, 208.

Sackville, one of the authors of
"Gorbordoc," 18.
Sandells, Fulk, 66.
Schlegel, quoted, on the historical
plays, 194.

Sea- Venture, the, 307.
Shakespeare, Edmund, 322.
Shakespeare, Gilbert, 322.
Shakespeare, Hamnet, 71; his
death, 182, 204, 231, 317; his
grave, 322.
Shakespeare, Joan, sister of Will-
iam, 29, 319, 323; the grand-
son of, 319; three sons of, 323.
See Hart.

Shakespeare, John, 27; his mar-
riage to Mary Arden, 28; his
public offices, 29; his children,
29; his means, 32; financial
embarrassments, 40, 203; al-
luded to, 77, 204; his coat-of-
arms, 27, 204; his death, 231,
318.
Shakespeare, Judith, the poet's
youngest daughter, 31, 319;
baptized, 71; married Thomas
Quiney, 31, 207, 319, 322; her
sons, 319; bequest to, in the
poet's will, 322; her death, 319;
her grave, 322.
Shakespeare, Mary, the poet's
mother, wife of John, 28; heir-
ess of Robert Arden of Wilm-
cote, 204; death of, 318.

Mervyn's Tower, 46.
Romances, the, 294, 296, 298, 314;
"Pericles," 294, 295; “ Cymbe-
line," 295; "The Winter's
Tale," 301-304; "The Tem-
pest," 306–310.
Rome, the theatre of, 4, 5.
"Romeo and Juliet," mistakes

in, 94; shows among the first
touches of the poet's hand, 113;
published in 1597, 115; in the
front rank of English poetry,
143; shows the poet's develop-
ment, 143; sources, 156, 157;|

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