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Books Books 1 - 10 of 88 on ... flow from the ideas of visible objects, when the objects are not actually before....
" ... flow from the ideas of visible objects, when the objects are not actually before the eye, but are called up into our memories, or formed into agreeable visions of things that are either absent or fictitious. "
The Scots Magazine, Or, General Repository of Literature, History, and Politics - Page 275
1795
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The Spectator, Volume 6

1729
...of the Imagination which flow from the Ideas of vifible Objefts, ' when the Objefts are not actually before the Eye, but are called up into our Memories,...formed into agreeable Vifions of Things that are either Abfeut or Fiftitious. THE Pleafures of the Imagination, taken in the full . Extent, are not fo grofs...
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The Spectator, Volume 6

1767
...of the imagination which flow from the ideas of vifible objedls, when the objects are not actually before the eye, but are called up into our memories,...vifions of things that are either abfent or fictitious: The pleafures of the imagination, taken in the full extent, are not fo grofs as thofe of fenfe, nor...
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The Spectator, Volume 6

1778
...ideas of vifible objects, when the objects are not aQually before the eye, but are called up into onr memories, or formed into agreeable vifions of things that are either abfent or fi&itious. The pleafures of the imagination, taken in their fall extent, are not fo grofs as thofe...
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Essays on rhetoric: abridged chiefly from dr. Blair's lectures on that science

Hugh Blair - 1784
...of the imagination, which flow from the idtas of vijible objeftst when tht 1>bjtBs are n6t aBually before the eye, but Are called up into our memories $ or formed into agreeable visions of things^ that ore either abfent orfittitious. This fentemfe is fomevtrhat clogged ty a tedious...
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The Pleasures of Imagination

Mark Akenside, Mrs. Barbauld (Anna Letitia) - 1794 - 195 pages
...pleafures of the imagination which flow from the ideas of vifible objefts when the objefts are not aftually before the eye, but are called up into our memories,...This definition feems to exclude a blind man from any fhare whatever of thofe pleafures, and yet who would deny that the elegant mind of BLACKLOCK was capable...
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The Universal Magazine, Volume 96

1795
...pleafures of the imagination which flow fronrthc ideas of vifible objecls when the objecls are not aitually before the eye, but are called up into our memories,...or formed into agreeable vifions of things that are eitlrr abfent or fictitious. " This definition fcemt to exclude a bund man from Ľny lhare whatever...
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Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres, Volume 2

Hugh Blair - 1801 - 370 pages
..." imagination , which flow from the ideas of " vifible objecls, when the objecls are not aclually " before the eye , but are called up into our " memories...agreeable vifions of " things, that are either abfent or ficlitious " It is a great rule in laying down the divifion of a fubjert , to ftudy neatnefs and brevity...
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Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres, Volume 1

Hugh Blair - 1802
...objects, when the objects are ";iot a£tually before the eye, but are called up into our mem" ories or formed into agreeable vifions of things, that are " either abfent or fi£titious." It is a great rule in laying down the divifion of a fubject, to ftudy neatnefs and brevity...
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Select British Classics, Volume 16

1803
...of the imagination which flow from the ideas of visible objects, when the objects are not actually before the eye, but are called up into our memories, or formed into agreeable visions of things that are either absent or fictitious. The pleasures of the imagination, taken in...
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The works of ... Joseph Addison, collected by mr. Tickell

Joseph Addison - 1804
...of the imagination, which flow from the ideas of visible objects, when the objects are not actually before the eye, but are called up into our memories, or formed into agreeable visions of things that are either absent or fictitious. The pleasures of the imagination, taken in...
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