Religion in Prison: 'Equal Rites' in a Multi-Faith Society

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, 2005 M10 20 - 248 pages
This was the first in-depth examination of relations between the Church of England and other faiths in the Prison Service Chaplaincy. It shows how the struggle for equal opportunities in a multi-faith society is politicising relations between the Church, the state and religious minorities. Drawing on a wealth of data, it considers the increasingly controversial role of Anglican chaplains in facilitating the religious and pastoral care of prisoners from non-Christian backgrounds, whose numbers among the prison population have been growing. Comparison with the United States underlines the closeness of the tie between the state and Christian churches in English prisons, and this book argues that it is time to reconsider the practice of keeping ethnic and religious minorities dependent on Anglican 'brokering' of their access to prison chaplaincy.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1 Equal opportunities and multiculturalism in prisons
1
2 Chaplaincy chaplains chapels and other faiths
25
3 Church of England prison chaplains
56
4 Visiting Ministers of other faiths
89
5 Facilitation or dependence?
116
6 Inclusion and exclusion
142
7 Prison chaplaincy in the United States
171
state church and diversity
201
Notes
220
Appendix
224
References
225
Index
230
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information