A Compendious History of English Literature, and of the English Language, from the Norman Conquest, with Numerous Specimens, Volume 1

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Griffin, Bohn, 1861
 

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Page 436 - Forget not yet the tried intent Of such a truth as I have meant ; My great travail so gladly spent, Forget not yet ! Forget not yet when first began The weary life ye know, since whan The suit, the service none tell can ; Forget not yet ! Forget not yet the great assays, The cruel wrong...
Page 467 - Cut is the branch that might have grown full straight, And burned is Apollo's laurel bough, That sometime grew within this learned man. Faustus is gone : regard his hellish fall, Whose fiendful fortune may exhort the wise Only to wonder at unlawful things, Whose deepness doth entice such forward wits To practise more than heavenly power permits.
Page 553 - Sweetest love, I do not go, For weariness of thee, Nor in hope the world can show A fitter love for me; But since that I Must die at last, 'tis best To use myself in jest Thus by feigned deaths to die.
Page 472 - But is there no quick recreation granted? King. Ay, that there is : our court, you know, is haunted With a refined traveller of Spain; A man in all the world's new fashion planted, That hath a mint of phrases in his brain : One, whom the music of his own vain tongue Doth ravish, like enchanting harmony...
Page 584 - I take my subjects' money, when I want it, without all this formality of parliament?" The bishop of Durham readily answered, "God forbid, Sir, but you should: you are the breath of our nostrils." Whereupon the King turned and said to the bishop of Winchester, "Well, my Lord, what say you?" "Sir," replied the bishop, "I have no skill to judge of parliamentary cases." The King answered, "No put-offs, my Lord; answer me presently." "Then, Sir," said he, "I think it is lawful for you to take my brother...
Page 568 - If it be objected this is no true dramatic poem, I shall easily confess it; non potes in nugas dicere plura meas Ipse ego quam dixi, willingly and not ignorantly in this kind have I faulted; for should a man present to such an auditory the most sententious tragedy that ever was written, observing all the critical laws, as height of style and gravity of person...
Page 441 - And next in order sad Old Age we found, His beard all hoar, his eyes hollow and blind, With drooping cheer still poring on the ground, As on the place where nature him...
Page 537 - East Gilds every lofty top, which late the humorous night Bespangled had with pearl to please the morning's sight: On which the mirthful quires, with their clear open throats, Unto the joyful morn so strain their warbling notes, That hills and valleys ring, and even the echoing air Seems all composed of sounds, about them everywhere. The throstle, with shrill sharps ; as purposely he song T...
Page 489 - And mochel mast to the husband did yield, And with his nuts larded many swine. But now the gray moss marred his rine, His bared boughs were beaten with storms, His top was bald, and wasted with worms, His honour decayed, his branches sere. Hard by his side grew a bragging Brere, Which proudly thrust into th" element, And seemed to threat the firmament.
Page 355 - Nicholas, that in a reign of eight years he formed a library of five thousand volumes. To his munificence the Latin world was indebted for the versions of Xenophon, Diodorus, Polybius, Thucydides, Herodotus, and Appian; of Strabo's Geography, of the Iliad, of the most valuable works of Plato and Aristotle, of Ptolemy and Theophrastus, and of the fathers of the Greek church.

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