Analysis of the English Sentence: Designed for Advanced Classes in English Grammar

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A.S. Barnes & Company, 1873 - 285 pages
 

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Page 190 - KNOW ye the land where the cypress and myrtle Are emblems of deeds that are done in their clime? Where the rage of the vulture, the love of the turtle, Now melt into sorrow, now madden to crime...
Page 230 - Wisely regardful of the embroiling sky, In joyless fields and thorny thickets leaves His shivering mates, and pays to trusted man His annual visit. Half afraid, he first Against the window beats ; then, brisk, alights On the warm hearth ; then, hopping o'er the floor, Eyes all the smiling family askance, And pecks, and starts, and wonders where he is ; Till more familiar grown, the table-crumbs Attract his slender feet.
Page 229 - Tis brightness all; save where the new snow melts Along the mazy current. Low the woods Bow their hoar head...
Page 263 - Behold, fond man ! See here thy pictured life; pass some few years, Thy flowering Spring, thy Summer's ardent strength, Thy sober Autumn fading into age, And pale concluding Winter comes at last, And shuts the scene.
Page 227 - The mountain thunders ; and its sturdy sons Stoop to the bottom of the rocks they shade. Lone on the midnight steep, and all aghast, The dark wayfaring stranger breathless toils, And, often falling, climbs against the blast. Low waves...
Page 264 - And died, neglected: why the good man's share In life was gall and bitterness of soul: Why the lone widow and her orphans pined In starving solitude! while luxury, In palaces, lay straining her low thought— To form unreal wants...
Page 265 - And what your bounded view, which only saw A little part, deem'd evil, is no more : The storms of Wintry Time will quickly pass, And one unbounded Spring encircle all.
Page 233 - In vain for him th' officious wife prepares The fire fair-blazing and the vestment warm; In vain his little children, peeping out Into the mingling storm, demand their sire, With tears of artless innocence. Alas! Nor wife, nor children, more shall he behold, Nor friends, nor sacred home.
Page 201 - Fierce spirit of the glass and scythe ! what power Can stay him in his silent course, or melt His iron heart to pity? On, still on He presses and forever. The proud bird, The condor of the Andes, that can soar Through heaven's unfathomable depths, or brave The fury of the Northern hurricane And bathe his plumage in the thunder's home, Furls his broad wings at nightfall and sinks down To rest upon his mountain crag...
Page 230 - Attract his slender feet. The foodless wilds Pour forth their brown inhabitants. The hare, Though timorous of heart, and hard beset By death in various forms, dark snares, and dogs, And more unpitying men, the garden seeks, Urged on by fearless want. The bleating kind Eye the bleak heaven, and next the glistening earth, With looks of dumb despair ; then, sad dispersed, Dig for the withered herb through heaps of snow.

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