A Handbook of English Literature

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C. Lockwood and son, 1897 - 384 pages
 

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Page 117 - Peace to all such ! but were there one whose fires True genius kindles, and fair fame inspires; Blest with each talent and each art to please, And born to write, converse, and live with ease : Should such a man, too fond to rule alone, Bear, like the Turk, no brother near the throne...
Page 169 - Lyrical Ballads, in which it was agreed that my endeavours should be directed to persons and characters supernatural, or at least romantic — yet so as to transfer from our inward nature a human interest and a semblance of truth sufficient to procure for these shadows of imagination that willing suspension of disbelief, for the moment, which constitutes poetic faith.
Page 179 - BRIGHT star ! would I were steadfast as thou art— Not in lone splendour hung aloft the night. And watching, with eternal lids apart. Like Nature's patient sleepless Eremite, The moving waters at their priestlike task Of pure ablution round earth's human shores...
Page 304 - Look once more ere we leave this specular mount Westward, much nearer by south-west, behold Where on the ^Egean shore a city stands Built nobly, pure the air, and light the soil ; Athens, the eye of Greece, mother of arts And eloquence...
Page 163 - As fair art thou, my bonnie lass, So deep in luve am I : And I will luve thee still, my dear, Till a' the seas gang dry. Till a' the seas gang dry, my dear, And the rocks melt wi' the sun : I will luve thee still, my dear, While the sands o
Page 87 - "Thou hast said much here of Paradise Lost,' but what hast thou to say of 'Paradise Found?
Page 224 - He saw thro' life and death, thro' good and ill, He saw thro' his own soul. The marvel of the everlasting will, An open scroll, Before him lay : with echoing feet he threaded The...
Page 303 - Our lingering parents, and to the eastern gate Led them direct, and down the cliff as fast To the subjected plain; then disappear'd. They looking back all th...
Page 286 - On this unworthy scaffold to bring forth So great an object: can this cockpit hold The vasty fields of France? or may we cram Within this wooden O the very casques That did affright the air at Agincourt?
Page 90 - twixt south and south-west side; On either which he would dispute, Confute, change hands, and still confute. He'd undertake to prove by force Of argument, a man 's no horse. He'd prove a buzzard is no fowl, And that a lord may be an owl, A calf an alderman, a goose a justice, And rooks committee-men and trustees.

About the author (1897)

Henry Austin Dobson was born on January 18, 1840 at Plymouth. He was employed in the Board of Trade from 1856-1901. He started writing original prose and verse around 1864 under the name Austin Dobson. His collections of poetry include Vignettes in Rhyme, Proverbs in Porcelain, Old-World Idylls, and Sign of the Lyre. After 1885, he wrote mostly critical and biographical prose. He wrote biographies of Henry Fielding, Thomas Bewick, Richard Steele, Oliver Goldsmith, Horace Walpole, and William Hogarth. His other works during this time include Four Frenchwomen, Eighteenth-Century Vignettes, and The Paladin of Philanthropy. He died on September 2, 1921.

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