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Lyrics of Modern Conquest. By Captain H.
(OPPEE, U. S. A..

351

Noon-tide Gun at the Palais Royal, the...... 250
Last Song, the. From the German, 878
Leaves from my Note-Bouk. By A NEW

0.
CONTRIBUTOR

875
Life's Setting Sun,

455
Our Carrie. By L. J. BATES

35
Look Upward....

496 Our Old Church: A Sketch from an Actuality 353
Letters from Poplar-Hill. Letter First. 564
Log-Chapel at Puddleford. By SIMON OAK-

P.
LEAF

587
Lays of Quakerdom: Execution of Mary Planet, the. Found in the Port-Folio of a
Dyer, at Boston, in 1659.
.614 Lunatic

8
LITERARY Notices.- Inklings, Sketch of Passages from the Papers of a Travelling
Life, Compsition, etc, by 8. D. Pratt,

Dentist

26
68 ; Cole's Paiotings, Life, Letters, and Pror Old Charlie. By CARL BENSON.

48
Writing by Louis L. Noble. 72; Pris- Photographs : a few from the French. .137
mali s, by Richard Haywarde, 73; Me-
moirs of Murgaret Fuller Ossoli, second

R.
notice, 76; Poems, by Alexander Smith,
79; North-American Review for July, Rose, the. From the German of FREILIGRATI 6
181; Thacker y's Lertu et on the old Rustic Sabbath-Picture.....

143
English Humorists, 185; The N-w-York Reminiscence, a. By MARTHA RUSSELL.... 170
Quarterly Review, 187; Home-Pictures, Rhine-Legend, 8. By Curtis Guild. ...562
by Mrs. Mary A. Deuníson. 188; S:enes Reed-Bird Shooting. By H. P. LELAND .618
and Adventures in the Ozark Mount-
ains, 159; The Australian Crusoes, by
Charles Crowcroft, Fsq., 292 ; The Sum-

8.
mer Stries of the South, by T Addi on Stanzas: Hereafter.' An Extract...

6
Richards, 294; Europe in a Hurry, by

By CHARLES LKLAND PORTER 80
George Wilkes, 295; A Memorial of

o Teach me to Forget!..

..136
Horatio Greenough, by Henry T. Tuck-

Christmas Courting.

153
erman, 297; Isaac T. Ipper, a True

Changes.

225
Life, by L. Maria Child, 404; six months

That Noble Thing - a Man.. .244
in Ilal., by George S Hillard, 406;

Life's Course

.259
Tanglewood Tales for Girls and Boys,

Come Away. By Miss M, E. WooD. 401
by Nathaniel Hawthorne, 407; The Story

Поре.

561
of Mont Blanc. by Albe t Smith 410; Steam-Yaebt: The North-Star. With an Il-
The Hun ed Bo-ton Orators, by James

lustration

32
Spear Loring. 411; The Second War

Song of the Pioneer's Son. By JOHN YB0-
with England, 517; The Jurist as a Re.

MAN..

61
former, an Address by William E. Cur- S'mile in Verse, a. By E. W. B.CANNING. .129
tis, 518; Salad for the Solitary, 519; A Sketches of Travel and Charac er. . 131, 250, 343
Visit to Europe in 1851, by Prof. Ben-

of Western Life. Number Four... 221
jamin Silliman, 519; Poems, by George Sea-Weeds. By DONALD MACLEOD.. .233
P. Morris, 520; Bleak House, by Charles

Serepade. a. By COLONEL EIDOLON.. ..258
Dickens, 522; New Work by the Author

So dier's Tale of Love, a By Rev. JAMES
of the 'Rector of Saint Bardolph's,'524;

GULBORNE LYONS..

.291
Peruvian Antiquities, translat-d by Dr. Student, the. By A NEW CONTRIBUTOR...341
F. L. Hawks, 622; Life of William P nk- Some Small Poems. By R. H. STODDARD...402
ney, by his Nephew, 623 ; Harry Harson, Shippegan

.676
by the author of 'The Attorney,' 624; Sabbath-Hymn. By J. B. B..

..601
Homes of the New World, by Fredriká
Bremer, 625; Hours of Life, and ober
Poems, by sarab Helen Whitman, 626;

T.
Venice, the City of the Sea, by Edmund

Tree of an Hundred Years. By LAWRENCE
Flagg, 627.

LABREE...

17
M.
Thackeray's Women.

.155
Musings: a Reminiscence.

28
The H-art I Love..

.338
Men, Manners, and Mountains. By R. M.

Though, a.

.366
RICHARDSON..

474
.111, 235, 383, 476, 603 Think and Work..

482
My Own Statement. By : MAN OF MEANS" 119 Trip up the Columbia in 1850.

.490
Memories. By A WESTERN MISSIONARY.....245 The First Murderer. By J. H. A. BONN...
Mary's Hollow, near Peekskill. By THOMAS

The Story of the Pearh...

491
MACKELLAR

273 Transcripts from the Docket of &late Sheritf.
Maitre Jacques. By J. W. DE FOREST 360 By F. L. VULTE.

.507
Mementos. By Curtis GUILD

374
My“ • Wifie's Awa'

381

V.
Moon-light and a Memory. By BENJAMIN F.
TAYLOR
382 Versicle: 'Keeping Watch'.

505
Mr. Brown's Pigs..

.391
Morning Memory, A. By Mary GRAVERAET. 475

w
Moults from the Wing of a White Black-bird. 456
Metaphysical Dilemma. By JOHN YEOMAN.566 Wasting of the Tribes, the. By ISAAC MAC-
Musings over a Volume of Shakspeare. By

LELLAN

389
HORACE RUBLEE..

573
Mystery of Song, the. By Captain H. Cop-

602

Y.
PEC, USA
My Spirit's Whisper. By JENNY MARSH,...621 Youth as It is : Lines By J. E. OTIS......165

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ART. I. JOURNEYINGS IN SPAIN. BY R. T. McCoun, Esq.,

1 II. STANZAS: ‘HEREAFTER :' AN EXTRACT,

5 III. THE ROSE. FROM THE GERMAN or FreiliGRATH,

6 IV. THE PLANET. FOUND IN THE PORT-Folio OF A LUNATIC,

8 V. TREE OF AN HUNDRED YEARS. BY LAWRENCE LABREE,

17 VI. THE GYPSIES OF ART. FROM THE FRENCH, BY CHARLES Astor BRISTED, 19 VII. LINES: SUMMER EVENING,

24 VIII. MUSINGS: A REMINISCENCE,

25 IX. PASSAGES FROM THE PAPERS OF A TRAVELLING DENTIST,

26 X. AN ANACREONTIC,

29 XI. STANZAS. BY CHARLES LELAND PORTER,

30 XII. THE STEAM-YACHT NORTH STAR, WITH AN ILLUSTRATION,

32 XIII. OUR CARRIE. By L. J. BATES,

35 XIV. THE BATTLE OF THE PYRAMIDS. BY ISAAC MCLELLAN,

36 XV. AN EASTERN "FALKLAND,' .

. 38 XVI. EXISTENCE: A FRAGMENT,

46 XVII. THE CRADLE-BED. By Eliza GRILLEY,

47 XVIII. "POOR OLD CHARLEY.' BY CARL BENSON,

48 XIX. 'ALWAYS CHEERFUL,' BY WILLIAM Pitt PALMER,

60 XX. SONG OF THE PIONEER'S SON. BY JOHN YEOMAN,

61 XXI. FROM BOSTON TO NEW-YORK THIRTY YEARS AGO,

62 XXII. DAMASCENA: A SKETCH. BY WILLIAM NORTH,

65

.

LITERARY NOTICES:

1. INKLINGS, SKETCHES OF LIFE, COMPOSITION, ETC. By S. D. PRATT,

68 2. COLE'S PAINTINGS, LIFE, LETTERS, AND WRITINGS. By Louis L. NOBLE, 72 3. PRISMATICS. By RICHARD HAYWARDE,

73 4. MEMOIRS OF MARGARET FULLER OSSOLI. SECOND NOTICE,

76 5. POEMS BY ALEXANDER SMITH,

79 ENTERED ACCORDING TO AOT OF CONGRESS, IN THE YEAR 1853, BY

EDITOR'S TABLE :

1. ANOTHER LETTER FROM `UP THE RIVER,'

82 2. EXHIBITION OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF DESIGN,

93 3. LORD JOHN RUSSELL'S CORRESPONDENCE, ETC., OF THOMAS MOORE, 96 4. GOSSIP WITH READERS AND CORRESPONDENTS,

97 1. THE ST. NICHOLAS' MONTHLY MAGAZINE: MYSTERIES OF OFFICE-SEEKING:

LETTERS FROM SECRETARY Marcy's Files. 2. A RAIL-ROAD ADVENTURE,
WITH A MORAL. 8. CRITICS, AS REPRESENTED BY METROPOLITAN NEWSPA-
PERS. 4. A BROOKLYN BELLE, BY A NEW-YORK BARD. 5. WASHINGTON
SQUARE: THE OLD POTTERS' FIELD: CORNELIUS MATHEWs, Esq. : THE "LIT-
ERARY WORLD' WEEKLY JOURNAL. 6. THE “BEDFORD MINERAL Water.'
7. 'FIGHT BETWEEN HARRY BROOME AND HARRY ORME FOR FIVE HUNDRED
POUNDS AND THE CHAMPIONSHIP OF ENGLAND. 8. A FORMIDABLE LITERARY
OFFER :' PORT-Folios oF THE KNICKERBOCKER. 9. BALM OF A THOUSAND
FLOWERS. 10. THE FALL OF JERICHO: A LARGE 'Purchase.. 11. THE
GUITAR IN THE HEAD :' A NEW DISORDER. 12. TRIBUTE OF AFFECTION :
BIRTH-DAY LINES TO MY WIFE.' 13. PISCATORY POACHERS APOSTROPHISED:
A REJOINDER: LAW-LATIN, WITH FREE TRANSLATIONS.' 14. RESIGNATION
BY BENJAMIN LODER, Esq., OF THE PRESIDENCY OF THE NEW-YORK AND ERIE
RAIL-ROAD: ELECTION OF HOMER RAMSDELL, Esq. 15. EDWIN FORREST, THE
AMERICAN TRAGEDIAN. 16. OUR SUMMER SANCTUM ON THE SHORES OF THE
TAPPAAN ZEE. 17. THE "SHAKSPEARE SOCIETY OF NEW-YORK.' 18. “ALMIGHTY
Cash:' SOME LINES ON THE SAME. 19. A NEGLECTED GRAPE-VINE, ETC.
20. New ILLUSTRATED WORK, BY OUR CORRESPONDENT WILLIAM North,
Esq. : ‘NAPOLEON THIRD :' "THE PEN AND PENCIL,'CINCINNATI. 21. 'MORAL
SUASION OF Dick TURPIN. 22. ANOTHER CORRESPONDENT ON “SECOND MAR-
RIAGES. 23. A BEAUTIFUL TRIBUTE TO A LADY'S ALBUM. 24. DAGUERREO-
TYPING IN NEW-YORK. 25. MESSRS. BININGER AND COZZENS'ESTABLISHMENT.
26. Death of Mr. Thomas WALKER. 27. THE PRINTERS' FREE LIBRARY.
28. GEOPONICS :' STATE OF THE CROPS AT OLD KNICK. PLACE, ON THE
Hudson. 29. CLOSE OF THE BACHELOR'S REVERIES: ' OUR New Consul
TO VENICE. 30. THIRD EDITION OF THE ATTORNEY.' 31. FORTY-SECOND
VOLUME OF THE KNICKERBOCKER.'

LITERARY RECORD :

1. EPHEMERA, BY EDWARD RICE AND J. HOWARD WAINWRIGHT, EsqRs. 2. Hall's

LEGENDS OF THE WEST.' 3. “FERN-LEAVES' FROM FANNY'S Port-Folio. 4. VALENTINE'S "MANUAL OF THE CORPORATION. 5. COLLIER'S RESTORED EDITION OF SHAKSPEARE. 6. "HAMLET IN A New GARB.'

SAMUEL HUESTON, IN TEI OLERK'S OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT COORT OP THE UNITED STATES FOR THE

SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF NEW-YORK.

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SPAIN is one agglomeration of mountains, which rise in every direction from the sea-coast toward the interior; and it is owing to this geological construction that it presents so great a variety of climates.

In the provinces of Andalusia, Murcia, and Valencia, which border on the Mediterranean, the winters are mild and genial, and the summers long and hot. In the northern provinces, which skirt the Pyrenees, the winters are cold and rainy, the springs and autumns damp and disagreeable, and the summers temperate. The provinces situated upon

the great central plateau are subject to great vicissitudes of temperature, the weather being very variable in winter, and scorching hot in summer.

This variety of climate is characterized by a corresponding variety of vegetable productions. In the northern regions we find the apple, the chestnut, and the cerealea; while in the southern we have the date, the olive, the orange, and the vine.

I left Madrid for Toledo, which is about twelve leagues distant, and still continued to traverse those desert-like plains wbich characterize the Castiles.

It would be some little consolation to the traveller, if he could doze away the weary hours whilst passing through this uninteresting region, but the jolting of the diligence over a shocking road, and the cloud of dust in which he is enveloped, render this impossible. After a long and weary day's ride, I beheld in the distance imperial Toledo, rising

from its lofty rocky foundation, with its Moorish Alcazar on one side, and its stupendous cathedral on the other, towering majestically above the town. The river Tagus surrounds the city except on one side, and this approach is protected by Moorish fortifications, now crumbling to ruin. After passing these fortifications, we ascended a very steep, winding road, and entered the city through a magnificent granite gateway.

The origin of Toledo is lost in the night of time. It was taken by the Romans 193 B. C., who were expelled by the Goths toward the end

1

VOL. XLII.

of the fifth century. In 714, the Goths were expelled by the Moors, and in 1085, the latter were driven forth by the Spaniards, under Alonzo VI., who took the title of Emperor of Toledo.

Toledo has sadly fallen from its high estate. Yet the city, and even the surrounding country, show the remains of prosperity passed away, in the numerous ruins of all ages that cover the soil.

The Roman, the Goth, and the Moor, have alike left some trace of their passage ; but it remained for the Spaniard to adorn it with one of those stately cathedrals which are the pride and boast of Spain.

The town is composed of an irregular jumble of narrow, tortuous, and steep streets, or rather lanes, impracticable for any thing like a vehicle, and the stranger is obliged to procure a guide to conduct him through the intricate labyrinth.

The dark Moorish houses have the appearance of so many prisons, and give to the place a gloomy aspect, which is heightened by the silent and deserted streets.

In walking around this most picturesque old city, the antiquary finds numerous objects to attract his attention. Here the ruins of the Roman, and the Goth are mingled with those of the Moor and Spaniard.

In the centre of the town towers aloft the cathedral, which was founded by St. Ferdinand in 1226, and completed in 1492.

The exterior is imposing, but the building is so much blocked up by surrounding houses that a good view of it cannot be obtained.

The interior realized all my ideas of the sublime in Gothic architecture. The body of the church is composed of five naves, the arches of which are supported by eighty-four enormous columns. The central nave is truly grand, and rises to the height of one hundred and sixty feet. Upon the sides of the building are numerous chapels, nearly as large as .churches, all of which are richly adorned with paintings and sculpture.

The choir, as in all Spanish churches, occupies the central nave, but from the mode of its construction, it does not mar the effect so much as that in the cathedral of Burgos. Its Silleria, which was carved in the fifteenth century, is truly worthy of admiration. Each stall represents some passage in the campaigns of Ferdinand and Isabella, and the examination of these beautiful carvings, which are authentic records of the costume and arms of the age, has afforded me hours of pleasure.

The Capilla Mayor contains many objects of interest. The retablo of the altar, which is reached by a flight of marble and jasper steps, is ornamented with a profusion of painted and gilded carvings, representing passages from the life of our Saviour. Here are the tombs of the ancient kings of Toledo, viz. : Alonzo VII., Sancho el Deseado, Sancho el Bravo, and the Infante Don Pedro. Here, likewise, repose the ashes of the great Cardinal Mendoza, who was called Lertius Rex, and almost shared the sovereignty with Ferdinand and Isabella. The chapel of los Reges Nuevos, or later kings of Toledo, is also well worthy of inspection. Here, under most beautifully sculptured niches, repose Henrique II., Henrique III., and Juan II.

The remaining chapels are all worthy of attention, but we will pass from them into the Sacristia, a magnificent gallery, adorned with many fine paintings by the great masters. The ceiling of this room is vaulted and painted in fresco by Luca Giordasio.

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