The History of New England from 1630 to 1649, Volume 2

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Little, Brown and Company, 1853

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Page 190 - I thank God, there are no free schools nor printing, and I hope we shall not have these hundred years. For learning has brought disobedience and heresy, and sects into the world, and printing has divulged them, and libels against the best government. God keep us from both"!
Page 103 - The Court agree to give Four Hundred Pounds towards a School or College, whereof Two Hundred Pounds shall be paid the next year, and Two Hundred Pounds when the work is finished, and the next Court to appoint where and what building.
Page 349 - English &c. of our charter and of our oaths of allegiance, whereas our allegiance binds us not to the laws of England any longer than while we live in England, for the laws of the parliament of England reach no further, nor do the king's writs under the great seal go any further; what the orders of state may, belongs not in us to determine.
Page 425 - ... the best part is always the least, and of that best part the wiser part is always the lesser.
Page 124 - Commissioners, or at least six of them, as in the sixth article is provided : and that no charge be required of any of the Confederates, in case of a defensive war, till the said Commissioners have met, and approved the justice of the war, and have agreed upon the sum of money to be levied, which sum is then to be paid by the several Confederates in proportion according to the fourth article.
Page 77 - He made his journey in 18 days. His relation at his return was, that it was about one hundred miles from Saco, that after 40 miles travel he did, for the most part, ascend, and within 12...
Page 100 - The sudden fall of land and cattle, and the scarcity of foreign commodities, and money, etc., with the thin access of people from England, put many into an unsettled frame of spirit, so as they concluded there would be no subsisting here, and accordingly they began to hasten away...
Page 277 - The covenant between you and us is the oath you have taken of us, which is to this purpose, that we shall govern you and judge your causes by the rules of God's laws and our own, according to our best skill.
Page 119 - And whereas in our settling (by a wise providence of God) we are further dispersed upon the Seacoasts and Rivers than was at first intended, so that we cannot according to our desire with convenience communicate in one Government and Jurisdiction : And whereas we live encompassed with people of several Nations and strange languages, which hereafter may prove injurious to us or our posterity...
Page 123 - It is also agreed, that the commissioners for this confederation hereafter at their meetings, whether ordinary or extraordinary, as they may have commission or opportunity, do endeavor to frame and establish agreements and orders in general cases...

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