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The following Remarks on this edition of the Testament have

been selected from the Periodicals undermentioned.

“ This is, without exception, one of the most complete edi. tions of the New Testament, on a small scale, that has yet issued from the press; and cannot fail, under the divine blessing, to promote a personal knowledge of divine truth. On every verse of the text, appropriate enquiries are suggested to the reader, by means of references to a key appended to the volume... The tables are got up with great judgment and care, and will be found extremely useful, not only to the youthful reader, but also to the more advanced Christian."

Christian Recorder, March 19, 1829. “ The Plan of the Work is, as far as we know, quite new, and its simplicity as well as its efficiency in promoting the object of the editor, must give it very powerful claims to public approbation. Independent of an analytical Table of Contents to the New Testament, another of the proper names of Scripture, properly accented; a third, of the places mentioned in the New Testament, with a short but very accurate geographical description; and three others, of a more miscellaneous description; it possesses a Key sheet,' and this, indeed, constitutes its peculiarity and chief excellence-suggesting a great number of questions to the reader of the New Testament, in a very simple and excellent form. The Plan of the Work is this. Throughout the text, there is attached to every separate topic, a reference letter which directs the reader to the Key, lying open before him, and in which the questions, of which we have spoken, are, comprised.

“ The character of these enquiries may be gathered from the following specimen : What Blessing is here sought; or acknowledged; or promised :—How great? How durable ? For whom sought? By whom acknowledged ? To whom promised ? On whose account was the blessing promised, or received ?'• What Duty is here enjoined ? On whom?Is it taught by precept, by example, or by inference : How enforced?'-"What Instructions are imparted in this parable? or in this metaphor ? What is their practical tendency ?'—What geograpbical information is known of this country, province, city, or river?' &c.

“Apart from the real utility of suggestions such as these, in a course of Scripture reading, they have a tendency to beget a habit of reflection and self-examination, which cannot but be attended with very beneficial effects.--We dismiss this excellent and very cheap book with unqualified commendation. It is very handsomely printed, and will form a valuable present to young persons especially."

Ecclesiastic, April, 1829.

This work, “ is well adapted to direct young teachers in Sunday Schools, who probably have enjoyed little opportunity for mental improvement, in an edifying and interesting mode of examination and instruction; and will often suggest useful topics to those of more cultivated minds.”

General Baptist Repository, April, 1829. “ The use of this edition in schools would greatly increase the pupils' acquaintance with the Word of God, and, by exercising the understanding upon it, would correct that mechanical habit of reading the Scriptures which is to frequently acquired. Much benefit might be expected from its introduction into family use. And it might be profitably consulted by preachers; as the questions frequently suggest subjects of doctrine and precept for elucidation, and the letters prefixed, in many instances, afford an easy method of tracing parallel passages.

Intellectual Repository, April, 1829.

1

USEFUL TABLES

ол

Scripture Names, Scripture Geography, Scripture Chronology, Scripture

References, &c.

PREPARED TO

Accompany the Reference Testament,

INSTRUCTION,

Originally drawn up by the late Rev. DR. ROMEyn, of 'New York, and recommended by the General Assembly of the

Presbyterian Church there.

"1. THE historical part of the portion of Scripture which constitutes the lessons—including the two great divisions, the church and the world.

II. The biographical part, including the two great classes, believers and unbelievers; with the effects which their good and bad example have had upon the church and the world:

III. The doctrinal part, including the nature and perfections of God-the character, person, offices, and work of Christ-the actual state of man by the fall, &c. &c.-marking distinctly the gradual increase of knowledge on these points from age to age, through the patriarchal and levitical dis. pensations, till the Christian dispensation furnished mankind with the clear, full developement of God's gracious purposes towards our fallen state.

IV. The preceptive part, including the whole range of our duties, accord. ing to the moral law.

V. The positive ordinances, including the sacraments, types, sacrifices, the priesthood, the temple service ; distinguishing between these positive institutions, and moral duties--the first dependent on the will of God, and therefore mutable the last on his nature, and therefore immutable: mark. ing the changes of the first from time to time, with the reasons for the change, and unfolding the influence which they obyiously were intended to have upon the spiritual exercises of our hearts, and our obedience to the moral law.

VI. The practical lessons which the historical and biographical parts fur. nish for the regulation of human conduct, in all the relations of life.”

N.B. In these outlines it will be understood that general questions should be asked the pupils ; and full instruction given by the Teacher under each division.

The subsequent Tables relative to the proper names, in Scripture-to sacred geography, and chronology to the fulfilment of prophecy and to some Miscellaneous topics: and in the case of proper names the accentu. ation being marked according to the plan adopted in Walker's and other approved Dictionaries, cannot fail to lead the pupil to an easy and correct 3

AN

Alphabetical Table,

Containing the Proper Names found in the New Testament, accented for pronunciation according to Walker's Key and Rules.

N. B.-The repetition of a word in Italic denotes that it should be pronounced according to the sound of the letters then used. Other Italic letters are silent. A, final, is the short broad sound of a, like a in umbrella, or in hallelujah, except in a few cases, where it is marked like a in fat. Where ti-â occurs, it should be pronounced like shế-å, and i short after s, followed by us, like shê-ús.

AX'ron.
An'drew. Ath'enş.

Bo'oz.

.
A-båd'dea. An-drðn'i-çus. At-ta-ll'a.
Ab'bå.
An'nd.

Au-gůs/tus. Çæ'şar.
A'bel.
An'nâs.
A'zor.

Ça-sa-re/a.
A-bi'a.
An'tl-och.

A-ZO'tus.
A-bl'a-thar. An'ti-pas.

Çai'a-nan.

B. Ab-i-lè'ne. An-tip'a-tris.

Båb'y-lon.

Çài'a-phas.
A-bi'ud. A-pol-10'ni-á. Ba lẫ-ầm, Çain.
A'brå-hâm. or A-pol'los.

Bao-lam. Ca-i'nan.
A-bram. A-pol'lyon. Ba'lak.

Çål'va-ry. A-çel'då-må.

Ap

phi-a. Bà'-råb'bas. A-hàioa. Aph'-e-a. Bår-a-chi/as.

Ça'na.
A-phai-cus. Ap pil-Forum. Bå-rak.

Ça'nâ-an.
A'çhaz.
A-qut-ià, Bår-jė şus.

Ca'-nan.
A'phim.

al-kwe-la. Bår-jo'na. Ça'nâ-an-ite. Ad'am.

A-ra'bi-a. Bår'na-bas. Can'da-çe.
Ad'di.
Afrå.
Bår'sa-bas.

Ça-per'nå-um.
Ad'mah.
A?râm.

Bår-thðl'o-mew.

Bår-ti-mé'us. Ad-ra-myt't1-üm. Ar-che-la'us.

Çap-pa-do'çi-å Adri-å.

Ar-chippus. Ba-ta'ni-å. Ça'ri-a.
Ag'a-bús. A-re-op'a-gite. Bé'él zê-bub.
A går. A-re-ópa-ğús. Be-li-al. Cas'tor.
A-grip på. Ar-e'tas. Ben'ja-min. çe'dron.
Alex-ån'der. A-ri-ma-thela. Bé-réa.
Alèx-an'dri-ans. A-ris-tår'çhus. Ber-ni'çê.

Çén'çhré-a.
Al-ex-&n'dri-å. A-ris-to-by lås. Beth-ab'a-rå. Çe'phas.
Al pha. Ar-ma-ged'don. Beth'a-ny.

Chålçe-db-ny.
Al-pheus. Ar-phåx'ad. Beth'el. Chal-dė'anş.
A-min'a-dab. Arte-mas. Bethes/-da.
A'mon.
A'så.
Beth'le-hem.

Chår/ran.
A'mos.
A'ser.

Bethophả?-ge.
A-pel'lės.
A si-a.
Beth-sa'i-da.

Chi'os.
Am-phip’6-lis.
Assos.
Bi-thyn'i-å.

Chld'e.
Am'pli-as. A-syn'çri-tus. Blas'tus.

Chồrà'zin.
An-a-ni'as.
A-thé'ni-anş.

Christ.

Cår'pus.

Cha'naan.

Bo-a-ner'çeş.

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