Film Propaganda: Soviet Russia and Nazi Germany

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I.B.Tauris, Oct 15, 1998 - 266 pages
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This is a new, substantially revised and enlarged edition of Richard Taylor's work on propaganda and film in Soviet Russia and Nazi Germany. Taylor examines how each government used the cinema's potential for mass political propaganda, analyzing and discussing films which exemplify important aspects of propaganda in process, and which are available for viewing. For this new edition, Richard Taylor makes use in particular of the flood of new material emerging from the former Soviet Union to examine two further classic Stalinist films. Grigori Alexandrov's musical comedyThe Circus (1936) celebrated in spectacular Hollywood fashion the supposed superiority of the Soviet way of life and new constitution. The Fall of Berlin (1949), by contrast, is a vast-scale and overtly-propagandistic paean to Stalin's pivotal role in the Second World War. Richard Taylor also revises and up-dates his coverage of Nazi Germany, including fresh illustrative material and an up-to-date bibliography.
 

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Parachute film that alarmed the Gemans and USA. Detailed description.

Contents

Introduction
3
Propaganda and Film
7
Soviet Russia 3 Russia The Historical Background
21
The Needs of Revolution
28
Themes and Variations
50
October
63
Three Songs of Lenin
74
Alexander Nevsky
85
Themes and Variations
152
Triumph of the Will
162
The Eternal Jew
174
Contents
185
Uncle Kriiger
187
Kolberg
196
Conclusions
209
Appendices
212

The Fall of Berlin
99
Nazi Germany
123
The Historical Background
125
The Needs of Revolution
142
Filmography
239
Bibliography
246
Index
260
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Richard Taylor is Professor of Politics at the University College of Swansea.

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