Selections from the British Apollo: Containing Answers to Curious Questions in Literature, Science, Folk-lore, and Love

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G. W. Niven
A. Gardner, 1903 - 288 pages
 

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Page 49 - Tis ten to one the wit escapes : But, when in capitals express'd, The dullest reader smokes the jest : Or else perhaps he may invent A better than the poet meant ; As learned commentators view In Homer more than Homer knew.
Page 137 - Not far from that most celebrated place,* Where angry Justice shows her awful face ; Where little villains must submit to fate, That great ones may enjoy the world in state; There stands a dome, majestic to the sight, And sumptuous arches bear its oval height ; A golden globe, placed high with artful skill, Seems, to the distant sight, a gilded pill.
Page 45 - A True Relation of the Apparition of one Mrs. Veal, the next day after her death, to one Mrs. Bargrave, at Canterbury, the 8th of September, 1705, which apparition recommends the perusal of Drelincourt's book of ' Consolations against the fears of Death.
Page 137 - There stands a dome, majestic to the sight, And sumptuous arches bear its oval height ; A golden globe placed high with artful skill, Seems to the distant sight, a gilded pill : This pile was, by the pious patron's aim.
Page 180 - ... all the money due for the same, a virago servant-maid of the house, observing them to be but slender-built animals, and in their mathematical postures on their shop-board appearing but so many pieces of men, resolved to encounter and pillage them on the road. The better to compass her design, she procured a very terrible great black pudding, which, having waylaid them, she presented at the breast of the foremost.
Page 167 - Twas a triumph of surgical skill Such as never was heard of till then; 'Twas the subject of lectures before Conventions of medical men. The news of this wonderful thing Was heralded far and wide ; But as for the patient there's nothing to say, Except, of course, that he died.
Page 104 - Bird in every Shell that I opened, as well the least as the biggest, I found so curiously and compleatly formed, that there appeared nothing wanting as to internal parts, for making up a perfect Seafowl : every little part appearing so distinctly that the whole looked like a large Bird seen through a concave or diminishing glass, colour and feature being everywhere so clear and neat.
Page 72 - The skin of a rattle-snake, and The mummy of an Egyptian king, I make no further provision for him in this my will. My eldest son, John, having...
Page 203 - I ate two fowls and half a pig ; Small is that praise ! * but oh ! a maid may want What she can neither eat nor drink. King. What's that ? Hunc. O spare my blushes ;f but I mean a husband. King. If that be all, I have provided one...
Page 60 - Patareaque regia servit; luppiter est genitor. per me, quod eritque fuitque estque, patet; per me concordant carmina nervis. certa quidem nostra est, nostra tamen una sagitta 520 certior, in vacuo quae vulnera pectore fecit.

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