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Pope

Silkworms finish their bottoms in about fifteen

From the bough, days.

Mortimer. She gave him of that fair enticing fruit. Miltom. Each Christmas they accounts did clear,

As the dove's flight did guide £neas, now And wound their bottom round the year. Prior. May thine conduct me to the golden bough. 12. BOTTOM of a lane. The lowest end.

Denbare 13. BOTTOM of beer. The grounds, or

Under some fav'rite myrtle's shady bougos,

They speak their passions in repeated vows. dregs.

Roscommon. TO BOTTOM.v. a. [from the noun.]

See how, on every bough, the birds express, 3. To build upon; to fix upon as a supe In their sweet notes, their happiness. Dryden. port: with on.

"T was all her joy the ripening fruits to tend, They may have something of obscurity, as And see the boughs with happy burdens bend. being bottomed upon, and fetched from, the true

Pope. nature of the things.

Hale. Bought. The pret. and part. of To buy. Pride has a very strong foundation in the The chief were these who not for empire mind; it is bottomed upon self-love. Collier.

fought, The grounds upon which we bottom our reason But with their blood their country's safety ing are but a part; something is left out, which bought. should go into the reckoning. Locke. BOUGHT. n. s. (from To bow.]

Action is supposed to be bottomcd upon prin- 1. A twist; a link; a knot. ciple.

Atterbury.

His huge long tail wound up in hundred folds, To wind upon something; to twist Whose wreathed boughts when ever he unfolds, thread round soincthing.

And thick entangled knots adown does slack. Therefore, as you unwind your love for him,

Fairy Queenho Lest it should ravel, and be good to none,

Immortal verse,
You must provide to bottom it on me. Sbaksp. Such as the melting soul may pierce,
To BO'TTOM. v. n.

In notes, with many a winding bought
To rest upon, as its

Of linked sweetness, long drawn out. Milton, ultimate support.

2. A flexure. Find out upon what foundation any proposition The flexure of the joints is not the same in advanced, bottoms; and observe the intermediate

elephants as in other quadrupeds, but nearer unto ideas, by which it is joined to that foundation

those of a man; the bougbi of the fore-legs not upon which it is erected.

Locke.

directly backward, but laterally, and somewhat Bo'i romen. adj. [from bottom.] Hav

inward.

Brown's Vulgar Erreurs. ing a bottom : it is usually compounded. BOU'ILLON. n. s. (French.) Broth;

T'here being prepared a number of flat-bote soup; any thing made to be supped: a tomed boats, to transport the land-forces, under term used in cookery.

the wing and protection of the great navy. Bacon. BO'ULDER Walls. [In architecture. ] Walls BO'TTOMLESS, adi. [from bottom.] With built of round flints or pebbles, laid in out a bottom; fathomless.

a strong mortar; used where the sea Wickedness may well be compared to a bot has a beach cast up, or where there are tomless pit, into which it is easier to keep one's

plenty of flints.

Builder's Dictionary.. self from falling, than, being fallen, to give one's To Bou'lt. v.a. See To BOLT. self any stay from falling intinitely. Sidney.

To BOUNCE. v. . [a word formed, says Is not my sorrow deep, having no bottom? Then be my passions bottomless with them. Shak. Skinner, from the sound.] Him the Almighty Power

1. To fall or fly against any thing with Hurl'd headlong flaming from th' etherial sky great force, so as to rebound. To bottomless perdition.

Milton.

The fright awaken'd Arcite with a start, BO'STOMRY. n. s. [In navigation and Against his bosom bounc'd his hearing heart. commerce.] The act of borrowing

Drydin. L.oney on a ship’s bottom; that is, by 2. To spring; to make a sudden leap. engaging the vessel for the repayment

High nonsense is like beer in a bottle, which of it, so as that, if the ship miscarry,

has, in reality, no strength and spirit, but frets,

and flies, and bounces, and imitates the passions the lender loses the money advanced ;

of a much nobler liquor.

Addison but, if it arrives safe at the end of the They bounce from their nest, voyage, he is to repay the money lent, No longer will carry,

Strit. with a certain premium or interest Out bounc'd the mastiff of the triple head; agreed on; and this on pain of forfeit. Away the hare with double swiftness tied. Swifi. ing the ship.

Harris. 3. To make a sudden noise. BOʻUCHET. 1. s. (French) A sort of

Just as I was putting out my light, another

bounces as hard as he could knock. Swift. pear. BOUD. 1. s. An insect which breeds in

4. To boast; to bully: a sense only used

in familiar speech. malt; called also a weevil. Dict.

5. To be bold, or strong. To BOCGF. v.n. [bouge, Fr.) To swell out.

Forsooth the bouncing Amazon, BOUGH. 1. s. [bo], Sax. the gh is mute.] Your buskin'd mistress, and your warriour love, An arm or large shoot of a tree, bigger To Theseus must be wedded.

Shakspeare. than a branch, yet not always distin. Bounce. no so[from the verb.] guished from it.

1. A strong sudden blow. A vine-labourer, finding a bough broken, took

The bounce burst ope the door; the scornful a branch of the same bough, and tied it about

fair the place broken.

Sidney.
Relentless look'd.

Drydes, Their lord and patron loud did him proclaim,

2 A sudden crack or noise. And at his feet their laurel bougbs did throw.

Fairy Queen. What cannoncer begot this lusty, blood/

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The freights of fitting ghosts in his thin bottom as, bottle-friend, a drinking. 10. A chance ; an adventure ; state of ha.

bottom, and must be partakers of their happiness

This whole argument will be like buttons of

Moses and the prophets, Christ and his após

his bottlescrevo in two days, by tying which ties, were in their times all preachers of God's

hardest, the point of the screw, or the neck of truch; some by word, some by writing, some by the bottle.

Swift both.

Hooker. BOʻTTOM. n. so [botm, Saxon ; bodent,
Which of them shall I take?
Both? one? or neither? Neither can be enjoy'd,

Germ.]
If both remain alive.

Shakspeare. 1. The lowest part of any thing. Two lovers cannot share a single bed; 2. The ground under the water. As therefcre both are equal in degree,

Shallow brooks that flow'd so clear, The lot of botb be left to destiny. Dryden. The bottom did the top appear.

Dryden A Vents and a Helen have been seen

3. The foundation; the groundwork. Botb perjur’d wives, the goddess and the queen.. On this supposition my reasonings proceed,

Granville,

and cannot be affected by objections which are BOTH, conj. [from the adjective.] As far from being built on the same bottom. Aitarb,

well: it has the conjunction and to cor 4. A dale; a valley; a low ground. respond with it.

In the purlieus stands a sheep-cote. A great multitude both of the Jews and also West of this place; down in the neighbour beta of the Greeks believed.

Acts.
tom.

Sbakspecte
Pow'r to judge betb quick and dead. Milton. On both the shores of that fruitful botton, are
Both the boy was worthy to be prais’d,

still to be seen the marks of ancient edifices. And Stimichon has often made me long

Addison en Italy. To hear, like him, so sweet a song. Dryden. Equal convexity could never be seen: the icBO'TRYOID. adj. [Priguoriëns.] Having the habitants of such an earth could have only the form of a bunch of grapes.

prospect of a little circular plain, which would The outside is thick set with botryoid efflo

appear to have an acclivity on all sides; so that rescencies, or small knobs, yellow, bluish, and every man would fancy hímself the lowest, and purple; all of a shining metallick hue. Woodw.

that he always dwelt and moved in a bottom.

Bentley. Bots. n. s. (without a singular.] A species of small worms in the entrails of

s. The part most remote from the views

the deepest part. horscs; answering, perhaps, to the as.

His proposals and arguments should with carides in human bodies.

freedom be examined to the bottom; that if there Pease and beans are as dank here as a dog, be any mistake in them, no body may be misled and that is the next way to give poor jades the by his reputation.

Locks bots.

Shakspeare. 6. Bound; limit. BO'TTLE. n. s. [bouteille, Fr.]

But there's no bottom, none, I. A small vessel of glass, or other matter, In my voluptuousness.

Sbakspark with a narrow mouth, to put liquor in. 7 The utmost extent or profundity of

The shepherd's homely curds, any man's capacity, whether deep or His cold ti in drink out of his leather bottle,

shallow. Is far beyand a prince's delicates. Sbakspeare. Many have a manner, after other men's speech,

I will fetch off these justices: I do see the to shake their heads. A great officer would say,

bottom of justice Shallow: how subject we old
men are to lying!

Sbakspeert

. it was as men shake a bottle, to see if there was any wit in their heads or no.

Bacon.

8. The last resort; the remotest cause ; Then if ale in glass thou wouldst confine,

first motion. Let twy clean bottle be entirely dry. King

He wrote many things which are not pube He: hrew into the enemy's ships earthen bote lished in his name; and was at the bottom of tles filled with serpents, which put the crew in

many excellent counsels, in which he did not disorder.

Arbubnot on Coins. appear, 2. A quantity of wine usually put into a 9. A ship; a vessel for navigation. bottle; a quart.

A bawbling vessel was he captain of,
shau

With which such scathful grapple did he make
and take other bottle.
stay,

Spectator.

With the most noble bottom of our fleet, Shaks, 3. A quantity of hay or grass bundled up.

My ventures are not in one bottom trusted;

Nor to one place. Methinks I have a great desire to a bottle of hay; good hay, sweet hay, hath no fellow. Shak.

We have memory not of one ship that everre But I should wither in one day, and pass

turned, and but of thirteen persons only, at se To a lock of hay, that am a battle of grass.

veral times, that chose to return in our botteesi, Donne.

He's a foolish seaman, To BO'TTLE. v. a. [from the noun.

in.] To

That, when his ship is sinking, will not enclose in bottles.

Unlade his hopes into another botten. Denbus. You may have it a most excellent cyder royal,

He puts to sea upon his own bottom ; holds the to drink or to bottle.

Mortuner.

stern himself; and now, if ever, we may expect When wine is to be bottled off, wash your new discoveries. bottles immediately before you begin; but be

He spreads his canvas, with his pole he steers, sure not to drain them.

Swift. BOʻTTLE is often compounded with other

bears. words; friend; bottle-companion.

zard. Sam, who is a very good bottle-companion, has been the diversion of his friends. Addison. BOʻTTLE-FLOWER. N. s. [cyanus, Lat.] A plant.

or misery. BO’TTLESCREW, n. s. [from bottle and

11. A ball of thread wound up together. screw.] A screw to pull out the cork. A good butler always breaks off the point of thread, close wound up.

Addison

Sir, you

Sbakspeare

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Silkworms finish their bottoms in about fifteen

From the bough,

Mortimer. She gave him of that fair enticing fruit. Milt087.
Each Christmas they accounts did clear,

As the dove's flight did guide Eneas, now
And wound their bottom round the year. Prior. May thine conduct me to the golden bough.
12, Bottom of a lane. The lowest end.

Denbama botm, Saxon; but 13. BOTTOM of beer. The grounds, or

Under some fav'rite myrtle's shady bougbs,

They speak their passions in repeated vows. dregs.

Roscommon. of any thing. To BO'TTOM.v. a. [from the noun.]

See how, on every bough, the birds express, er the water.

1. To build upon; to fix upon as a sup: In their sweet notes, their happiness. Dryden. fou'd 9 deur, port: with on.

"T was all her joy the ripening fruits to tend, They may have something of obscurity, as

And see the boughs with happy burdens bend. being bottomed upon, and fetched from, the true

Pope. nature of the things.

Hale. BOUGHT. The pret. and part. of To buy.
Pride has a very strong foundation in the The chief were these who not for empire
mind; it is bottomed upon self-love. Collier.

fought,
The grounds upon which we bottom our reason But with their blood their country's safety
ing are but a part; something is left out, which bought.

Pope.
should go into the reckoning. Locke. BOUGHT. n. s. [from To bow.]
Action is supposed to be bottomed upon prin- 1. A twist; a link; a knot.
ciple.

Atterbury.

His huge long tail wound up in hundred folds,
. To wind upon something; to twist Whose wreathed boughts when ever he unfolds,
thread round something.

And thick entangled knots adown does slack.
Therefore, as you unwind your love for him,

Fairy Queetto
Lest it should ravel, and be good to none,

Immortal verse,
You must provide to bottom it on me. Sbaksp.

Such as the melting soul may pierce,
In notes, with many a winding bought

Of linked sweetness, long drawn out. Milton,

2. A flexure.
Find out upon what foundation any proposition
advanced, bottoms; and observe the intermediate

The flexure of the joints is not the same in

elephants as in other quadrupeds, but nearer unto ideaş, by which it is joined to that foundation those of a man; the bought of the fore-legs not upon which it is erected.

Locke.

directly backward, but laterally, and somewhat BO'I TONED, adj. [from bottom.] Hav

inward.

Brown's Vulgar Erreurs. ing a bottom : it is usually compounded.

BOU'ILLON. n. s. [French.) Broth; There being prepared a number of flat-bot soup; any thing made to be supped: a tomed boats, to transport the land-forces, under term used in cookery.

the wing and protection of the great navy. Bacon. Bo'ulder Walls. [In architecture. ] Walls One or prizi BO'TTOMLESS. adi. [from bottom.] With built of round flints or pebbles, laid in out a bottom; fathomless.

a strong mortar; used where the sea
Wickedness may well be compared to a bot has a bcach cast up, or where there are
tomless pit, into which it is easier to keep one's plenty of fints.

Builder's Dictionarya.
self from falling, than, being fallen, to give one's To BOULT. v. a. See To BOLT.
self any stay from falling infinitely. Sidney.
Is not my sorrow deep, having no bottom?

To BOUNCE. v. 11. [a word formed, says
Then' be my passions bottomless with them. Shak. Skinner, from the sound.)
Him the Almighty Power,

1. To fall or fly against any thing with
Hurl'd headlong flaming from th' etherial sky
'To bottomless perdition.

great force, so as to rebound.
Milton.

The fright awaken'd Arcite with a start, BO'TTONRY. n. s. [In navigation and Against his bosom bounc'd his hearing heart, commerce.] The act of borrowing

Dryden. r.oney on a ship’s bottom; that is, by 2. To spring; to make a sudden leap. engaging the vessel for the repayment

High nonsense is like beer in a bottle, which so as that, if the ship miscarry,

has, in reality, no strength and spirit, but frets,
the lender loses the money advanced ;

and flies, and bounces, and imitates the passions
of a much nobler liquor.

Audison,
but, if it arrives safe at the end of the They bounce from their nest,
voyage, he is to repay the money lent, No longer will tarry.

Swift.
with a certain premium or interest Out bounc'd the mastiff of the triple head;
agreed on; and this on pain of forfeit Away the hare with double swiftness fled. Stuijt.

Harris. 3. To make a sudden noise
BO'UCHET. 1. so [French] A sort of

Just as I was putting out my light, another
pear.

bounces as hard as he could knock. Swift. An insect which breeds in

4. To boast; to bully: a sense only used malt; called also a weevil.

in familiar speech.

Dict.
To Bocor. v.7. [bouge, Fr.) To swell out,

5. To be bold, or strong.
Bough. 11. s. [boz, Sax. the ghis mute.]

Forsooth the louncing Amazon,

Your buskin'd mistress, and your warriour love,
An arm or large shoot of a tree, bigger

To Theseus must be wedded.

Shakspeare.
than a branch, yet not always distin-
guished from it.

BOUNCE. 1. s. [from the verb.]
A vine-labourer, finding a bough, broken, took

1. A strong sudden blow.
a branch of the same bough, and tied it about

The bounce burst ope the door; the scornful the place broken.

fair

Sidney,
Their lord and patron loud did him proclaim,

Relentless look'd.

Dryden,
And at his feet their laurel boughs did throw.

2. A sudden crack or noise.
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He speaks plain cannon fire, and smoke, and Before his lord the ready spaniel bounds; bounce;

Panting with hope, he tries the furrow'd grounds. He gives the bastinado with his tongue. Shaks. Two hazel-nuts I threw into the fame,

When sudden through the woods a bounding And to each nut I gave a sweetheart's name;

stag This with the loudest bounce me sore amaz'd, Rush'd leadlong down, and plungid amidst the That in a flame of brightest colour blaz’d. Gay.

river.

Route 3. A boast; a threat: in low language. Warbling to the vary'd strain, advance BO'UNCER. n. s. [from bounce.] A boaster; Two sprightly youths, to form the bounding

dance. a bully ; an empty threatener : in col

Popes loquial speech.

2. To rebound; to fly back by repercus. BOUND. n. s. [from bind.]

sion.

Mark then a bounding valour in our English, 1. A limit; a boundary; that by which

That being dead, like to the bullets grazing, any thing is terminated.

Breaks out into a second course of mischief. Illimitable ocean! without bound,

Sbakspeare Without dimension; where length, breadth, and T. BOUND. v.a. To make to bound. height,

If I might buffet for my love, or bound my And time, and place, are lost,

Milton.

horse for her favours, I would lay on like a Those vast Scythian regions were separated by

butcher, and sit like a jackanapes, never off. the natural bounds of rivers, lakes, mountains,

Sbakspeare. woods, or marshes.

Temple.

If love, ambitious, sought a match of birth, Indus and Ganges, our wide empire's bounds,

Whose veins bound richer blood than lady Blanch? Swell their dy'd, currents with their natives

Sbakspeares wounds.

Dryden. Bound. The pret. and part. pass.cf bind. Through all th' infernal bounds, Which flaming Phlegethon surrounds,

Nay, said Pamela, none shall take that office Sad Orpheus sought his consort lost. Pope.

from myself, being so much bound as I am for my education.

Sidney. 2. A limit by which any excursion is re

This is Antonio, strained.

To whom I am so intinitely bound,Hath he set bounds between their love and me?

-You should in all sense be much hound to him; Iam their mother, who shall bar me from them?

For, as I hear, he was much bound for vai. Skals.

Sbakspcare. The gentleman is learn'd, a most rare speaker, Stronger and fiercer by restraint he roars, To nature none more bound. Sbakspeare And knows no bound, but makes his pow'r his

The bishops of Hungary, being wonderfully shores.

Denbam.

rich, were bound to keep great numbers of horseAny bounds made with body, even adamantine

men, which they used to bring into the field. walls, are far from putting a stop the mind, in

Kacles. its progress in space.

Locke.

They summoned the governor to deliver it to 3: [from To bound, v.n.] A leap; a jump; them, or else they would not leave one scone a spring.

upon another. To which the governor made no Do but note a wild and wanton herd,

other reply, than that he was not bound to repair Or race of youthful and unhandled colts,

it; but, however, he would, by God's help, keep Fetching mad bounds, bellowing, and neighing

the ground afterwards,

Clarende. loud.

Sbakspeare. BOUND), adj. [a word of doubtful etymoThe horses started with a sudden bound, logy.] Destined; intending to come And Hung the reins and chariot to the ground. to any place.

Addison.

His be that care, whom most it doth concern, Dext'rous he 'scapes the coach with nimble Said he; but whither with such ḥasty flight bounds,

Art thou now bound? for well mighi I discer Whilst ev'ry honest tongue Stop thief resounds.

Great cause, that carries thee so swift and light,

G.zy. A rebound; the leap of something To he bound for a port one desires extremely, fiying back by the force of the blow. and sail to it with a fair gale, is very pleasant

These inward disgusts are but the first bound of this ball of contention. Decay of Piety, Willing we sought your shores, and hither TO BOUND). v. a. (from the noun.]

bound,

The 1. To limit ; to terininate.

port so long desir'd at length we found.

Drydere A lofty tow'r, and strong on every side, With treble walls, which Phlegethon surrounds, BOʻUNDARY. n. s. [from bound.] Limit; Whose fiery flood the burning empire bounds,

bound.

Dryden. He suffers the confluence and clamours of the 2. To restrain; to confine.

people to pass all barındaries of laws, and revea Take but degree away,

rence to his authority.

Sensation and reflection are the boundaries of The bounded waters Would lift their bosoms higher than the shores,

our thoughts; beyond which the mind, whated And make a sop of all this solid globe. Sbaksp.

efforts it would make, is not able to advance. 3. Sometimes with in.

Great part of our sins consist in the irregul. My mother's blood

rities attending the ordinary pursuits of life ; 59 Runs on the dexter cheek, and this sinister that our reforination must appear, by pursi.in Bounds in my sire's.

Sbakspeare,
them within the boundaries of duty.

Rosette 7. BOUND. v. n. (bondir, Fr.]

Bo'unden. The part. pass. of bind. Not 1. To jump; to spring; to move forward now much in use. by leaps.

Hercafter, in a better world than this,
Torrismond appear'd,

I shall desire more love and knowledge of you... Gave me his liand, and led me lightly o'er, - rest much bounden to you: fare you well. Leaping and bounding on the billows heads. Dryd,

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We also most humbly besought him to accept The quality of being bountiful; gene.
of us as his true servants, by as just a right as rosity:
ever, men on earth were bounden. Bacon. Enriched to all hountifulness.

Corinthians.
To be careful for a provision of all necessaries BO'UNTIHEAD., n. š. (from bounty and
for ourselves, and those who depend on us, is a
bounden duty

BO'UNTIHEDE.

See Rogers.

bead, or hood. BO'UNDING-STONE.? 1. s. A stone to

BO'UntIHOOD, Hood.] Goodness;
BOUND-STONE. S

virtue. Out of use.
play with
I am past a boy;

This goodly frame of temperance,
A sceptre 's but a play-thing, and a globe

Formerly grounded, and fast settled
A bigger bounding-stone.

Dryden,

On firm foundation of true bountibead. Fairy Q. BO'UNDLESS. adj. (from bound.] Unli

How shall frail pen, with fear disparaged,

Conceive such sovereign glory, and great bountimited; unconfined ; immeasurable ; il.

bead?

Fairy Queen. limitable.

BO'UNTY. 1. s. [bonté, Fr.]
Beyond the infinite and boundless reach

1. Generosity; liberality ; munificence.
Of mercy, if thou didst this deed of death,
Art thou damn'd, Hubert. Shakspeare.

We do not so far magnify her exceeding Heav’n has of right all victory design'd;

bounty, as to affirm, that she bringeth into the world the sons of men adorned with

gorgeous Whence boundless power dwells in a will confin'd.

attire.

Hooler.
Dryden.

If
Man seems as boundless in his desires, as God

you knew to whom you shew this honour,

I know you would be prouder of the work, is in his being; and therefore nothing but God hin:self can satisfy him.

Than customary bounty can enforce you. Sbals.
Soutb.

Such moderation with thy bounty join,
Though we make duration boundless as it is,

That thou may'st nothing give that is not thine. we cannot extend it beyond all being. God tills

Denbam, eternity, and it is hard to find a reason why any. one should doubt that he fills immensity. Locke.

These godlike men, to wanting virtue kind,
Some guide the course of wand'ring orbs on

Bounty well plac'd preferr’d, and well design'd,
To all their titles.

Dryden.
high,
Or roll the planets through the boundless sky.

2. It seems distinguished from charity, as

Popez a present from an alms; being used BO'UNDLESSNESS. N. s. [from boundless.] when persons, not absolutely necessi. Exemption from limits.

tous, receive gifts; or when gifts are God has corrected the boundlessness of his yo given by great persons. luptuous desires, by stinting his capacities. Soutb. Tell a miser of bounty to a friend, or mercy to BO'UNTEOUS. adj. [from bounty.] Liberal; the poor, and he will not understand it. South. kind; generous; munificent ; benefi

Her majesty did not see this assembly so pro-cent: a word used chiefly in poetry for

per to excite charity and compassion; though I bountiful.

question not but her royal bounty will extend its

self to them.
Every one
According to the gift which bounteous nature

To BO'URGEON. v. n. [bourgeonner, Fr.)
Hath in him clos'd.

Shakspeare. To sprout; to shoot into branches; to
Her soul abhorring avarice,

pnt forth buds.
Bounteous, but almost bounteous to a vice. Drud. Long may the dew of heaven distil upon then,
Bo'UNTEOUSLY. adv. [from bounteous.] to make them bourgeon and propagate among
Liberally; generously ; largely.

themselves.

Howel. He bounteously bestow'd unenvy'd good

O that I had the fruitful heads of Hydra,

Dryden. That one might bourgeon where another feil! Bo'unTEOUSNESS. n. s. [from bounteous.]

Still would I give thee work.

Dryden,
Munificence ; liberality; kindness.

BOURN. . s. [borne, Fr.]
He filleth all things living with bountiousness.

I. A bound; a limit.

Psalms. Bourn, bound of land, tilth, vineyard, none. Bo’UNTIFUL. adj. [from bounty and full.]

Sho4speure.

That undiscover'd country, from whose horn 1. Liberal; generous ; munificent.

No traveller returns.

Sbukspeare.
As bouw.tiful as mines of India. Sbakspeare.

False,
If you will be rieh, you must live frugal; if As dice are to be wish'd by one that fixes
you will be popular, you must be bountiful,

No bourn 'twixt his and mine. Sbakspeare.

Taylor. I know each lane, and every alley green, I am obliged to return my thanks to many, And every bosky bourn from side to side. Milt. who, without considering the man, have been bountiful to the port,

Dryden.

2. [from burn, Saxon.) A brook; a torGod, the bountiful author of our being. Locke.

rent: whence many towns, seated near 2. It has of before the thing given, and to brooks, have names ending in bourn. before the person receiving.

It is not now used in either sense ; . Our king spares nothing, to give them the though the second continucs in the share of that félicity, of which he is so bountiful

Scottish dialect.

Dryden. Ne sivelling Neptune, ne loud thund'ring Jové, Bo’UNTIFULLY.adv. (from bountiful Li Can change my cheer, or make me ever mourn; berally; in a bountiful manner; largely.

My little boat can safely pass this perilous bourri

Spenser
And now thv alms is given,
And thy poor starveling bountifully red. Denne.

T. ROUSE. v. n. (buysen, Dutch.) To
It is affirmed, that it never raineti i Egypt;

drink lavishly ; to tope.
the river bountifully requiting it in its inunda As he rode, he somewhat still did eat,

Brožun'. Vulyar Errours. And in his hand did bear a borsing can,
BU'UNTIFULNESS. n. s. [from bountiful.]

Of which he sipt.

fairy Queent

Addison

On me.

to his kingdom.

tion.

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