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SECT.

SONING.

of the subjects of denonstra-

28

tive reasoning

29

X.- PRACTICAL DIRECTIONS IN

SECT.

REASONING.

or testimony as given under

oath

SECT. On the testimony of the dying, 52

Practical rules in reasoning re-

quired by the frequency of

On the credibility of historical

accounts

30

its applications

(I) Importance of being influ.

enced in reasoning by a de-

XII.-OF IMAGINATION.

sire of the truth

31

(II) Care to be used in cor-

Definition of the power of im-

muy stating the subject of agination

inquiry and discussion 32 The creations of imagination

(Il Consider the kind of evi not entirely voluntary

55

deze appicable to the sub of imaginations not attended

33

with desire

(ir a ecoding all unmean-

Of imaginations attended with

84

desire

57

in Are beinir auction of

Further illustrations of the

avrigai ari ammon-

same subject

58

35

Remarks from the writings of

ITP Reri the azi offarar-

Dr. Reid

59

stats or spasms 36 Grounds of the preference of

(VID) On the syphism of esti one conception to another

rating koons and charac Mental process in the forma-

ter inn the circumstance of

tion of Milton's imaginary

SUCCESS merely

37 paradise

(VID) On the use of equivo-

Limitations of imagination by

cal terms and phrases

38 the condition of the senses 62

(IX) Ofadherence to our opin Explanation of the case of the

ions

39

Erfects on the mind of debating Works of imagination give dif-

for victory instead of truth 40 ferent degrees of pleasure

On the influence of the study On the utility of the faculty of

of the law

the imagination

Mental process in voting on leg of the importance of the imag-

islative and other subjects

ination in connection with

the reasoning power

66

XI.-EVIDENCE OF TESTIMONY.

Use of the imagination in his-

torical composition

67

of the importance of the evi Of misconceptions by means of

68

the imagination

dence of testimony and of its

perversions

43

Explanation of the above mis-

Ol' the competency of the per-

representations of the imag-

69

ination

son who testifies

Of habits of veracity in connec-

Feelings of sympathy aided by

70

tion with testimony

the imagination

45

of the influence of friendship

&c. on testimony

46 XIII.-COMPLEX NOTIONS OF

Influence of personal interest

INTERNAL ORIGIN.

on testimony

of the intluence on testimony General nature of complex no-

of a spirit of partisanship 48

tions of internal origin

of the memory in connectiva of complex notions formed by

mih testimony

the repetition of the same

72

thing

jatient of the peabilir of a

amutation on tesi.per 30,01 the help attorded by names

42

SECT.

SECT.

in the combination of num communication of the mental

bers

73

states from one to another. 98

Instances of complex notions The mental states first expres-

made up of different simple sed by gestures and the coun-

ideas

74)

tenance

99

Of the different ways of form or the use made of natural

ing such complex notions 75 signs by the deaf and dumb 100

Not the same internal complex Further illustrations of the

ideas in all languages

76 great power of natural signs 101

Origin of the complex notion of the art of Pantomime a-

of a Supreme Being

77

mong the Romans

102

of the system of signs existing

XIV.-ORIGIN OF PREJUDICES. among the North American

Savages

103

of the meaning of prejudices 78 of the symbolic exhibitions of

Of erroneous judgments from the Hebrews

104

constitutional causes 79|)of the instinctive interpreta-

of prejudices in favour of our tion of certain natural signs 105

youth

80|| Further evidence of the instinc-

of the results or effects of the tive interpretation of natural

prejudices in favour of early signs

106

life

81 || Considerations on the use of

Prejudices of temporary dispo-

natural signs

107

sition

82

of prejudices of home and II -ORAL SIGNS OR SPEECH.

country

83

Professional prejudices

84 Remarks on the original forma-

Prejudices of sects and parties 85

tion of oral signs

108

Prejudices of authority 86. Of the possibility of forming an

Prejudices of careless and indis oral language without divine

criminate reading

aid

109

Prejudices of presumption

88 On the possibility of an artifi-

Prejudices of enthusiasm 89 cial language not addressed

Prejudices of superstition 90

to the hearing

110

Of superstition in times of dis-

Oral signs or words are in gen-

tress and danger

91

eral arbitrary

111

Prejudices of personal friend-

Words at first few in number

ships and dislikes

92

and limited to particular ob-

Prejudices of custom or fashion 99 jects

112

Correctives of fashionable prej-

of the formation of general

udices

94 names or appellatives 113

Prejudices of mental indolence 95 The formation of appellatives

of the methods of subduing

implies the feeling of resem-

the prejudices of others

blance

114

of guarding against prejudices

On the increase in the number

in early education

97

of nouns or appellatives 115

of the formation of verbs 116

Formation of ailjectives and

PART THIRD.

other parts of speech

117

The principles of the preceding

LANGUAGE OR SIGNS OF MEN section confirmed from the

TAL STATES.

deaf and dumb

118

of the formation of preposi-

Chap. I.-NATURAL SIGNS.

tions

119

Of the origin and original im-

Of the natural and necessary port of conjunctions

120

96

[graphic]

SECT.

PART FOURTII. Instances of national associa-

tions

183

SENTIENT STATES OF THE of utility as an element of

MIND.

beauty

184

of proportion as a cause or el-

CLASS FIRST,

ement of beauty

185

Relation of emotions of beauty

EMOTIONS

to the fine arts

186

Differences of original suscepti-

Chap. I.-EMOTIONS OF BEAUTY.

bility of this emotion 187

Emotions of beauty compared

SECT.

with others

188

of the sentient states of the Summary of views in regard

mind in general

164 to the beautiful

189

of the general division of the of picturesque beauty

190

sentient states of the mind in.

to emotions and desires 165 111.-EMOTIONS OF SUBLIMITY.

Explana tions and characteris-

tics of emotions of beauty 166 Connection between beauty and

Of what is meant by beautiful sublimity

191

objects

167 Occasions of emotions of sub-

Results of constantly referring limity.---Vast extent and

emotions of beauty to the out height

192

ward cause

168 Indications of power accompan-

Extensive application of the ied by emotions of the sub-

term beauty

169 lime

193

All objects not equally fitted to Relation of the trait of sublimi-

excite emotions of beauty 170 ty to the emotions within 194

A susceptibility of emotions of Sublime objects have some ele-

beauty an ultimate principle ments of beauty

195

of our constitution

171|Emotions of grandeur

196

Remarks on the beauty of forms 172 Of the original or primary sub-

Of the prevalence of beauty limity of objects

197

which is founded on forms 173 Considerations in proof of the

Perceptions of congruity or fit original sublimity of objects 198

ness a source of emotions of Influence of association on emo-

beauty

174 tions of sublimity

199

of the original beauty of col Further illustrations of sublim-

ours

175 ity from association

200

Or sounds considered as

source of beauty

176 IV.-MORAL SUBLIME.

of motion as an element of

beauty

177|or sublimity in actions or mor-

Explanation on the beauty of al sublime

201

motion from Kaimes

178 Instances and illustrations of

or intellectual and moral ob moral sublime

202

jects as a source of the beau The moral sublime involves the

tiful

179

morally beautiful

203

Of a distinct sense or faculty A degree of moral sublime in

of beauty

180 acts of remarkable integrity 204

The parental affection and de-

II.--OF ASSOCIATED BEAUTY. votedness of a North Amer-

ican Indian

205

Objects may become beautiful Of the moral sublimity of great

by association merely

181 benevolent undertakings 206

Further illustrations of associa The spirit of forgiveness in

ted feelings

182) some cases sublime

207

a

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