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" ... speaker that ever perplexed an audience. It has been long since said by the historian that a collection of the Protector's speeches would make, with a few exceptions, the most nonsensical book in the world; but he ought to have added that nothing... "
Woodstock, Or, The Cavalier: A Tale of the Year Sixteen Hundred and Fifty-one - Page 106
by Walter Scott - 1826 - 370 pages
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Synonymisches Handwörterbuch der englischen Sprache für die Deutschen

H. M. Melford - 1841 - 448 pages
...fortitude with which women sustain the most overwhelming reverses of fortune. (IV. Irving's Sk. Sooii.) It was also remarked of Cromwell, that though born...education and breeding, connected with such an advantage , he could never acquire , the courtesies usually exercised among the higher classes in Iheir intercourse...
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English Synonymes Classified and Explained: With Practical Exercises ...

George Frederick Graham, Henry Reed - 1847 - 344 pages
...objects as the waves had tossed ashore — ' I'm in-, on Naming of Fleets.'] Exercise. " It was also of Cromwell, that though born of a good family* both...opportunities of education and breeding connected with s^ch an advantage, he never could acquire the courtesies usually exercised among the higher classes...
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Hogg's Weekly Instructor, Volumes 1-2

1848
...really intended should be understood. Though born of a good family both by father and mother's side, and although he had the usual opportunities of education...and breeding connected with such an advantage, the democratic ruler could never acquire, or else disdained to practise, the courtesies usually exercised...
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The Waverley Novels: Woodstock. Chronicles of the Canongate: the Highland ...

Walter Scott - 1854
...world ; but he ought to have added, that nothing could be more nervous, concise, and intelligible, than what he really intended should be understood. It was...born of a good family, both by father and mother, aud although he had the usual opportunities of education and breeding connected with such an advantage,...
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English Synonymes Classified and Explained: With Practical Exercises ...

George Frederick Graham, Henry Reed - 1856 - 344 pages
...tossed ashore— ' Poems m Naming of Place*.'] Exercise. " li was also of Cromwell, that though bom of a good family, both by father and mother, and although...education and breeding connected with such an advantage, he never could acquire the courtesies usually exercised among the higher classes in their intercourse...
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English Synonyms ...

George Frederick Graham - 1857
...Naming of Places.'} Exercise. ' It was also of Cromwell, that though hom of a good family, hoth hy father and mother, and although he had the usual opportunities of education and hreeding connected with such an advantage, he never could acquire the courtesies usually exercised...
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Englische synonymik: Grössere ausg. für lehrer und studierende

Clemens Klöpper - 1881 - 468 pages
...popular and efficacious art of instruction (Johnson). To impart i»istruction. And although he (Cromwell) had the usual opportunities of education and breeding...higher classes in their intercourse with each other (Scott). Tram up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old, he will not depart from him (Prov....
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Woodstock: Or, The Cavalier

Walter Scott - 1894 - 549 pages
...world; but he ought to have added that nothing could be more nervous, concise, and intelligible than what he really intended should be understood. It was...democratic ruler could never acquire, or else disdained to practice, the courtesies usually exercised among the higher classes in their intercourse with each...
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Woodstock, Volume 1

Walter Scott - 1894 - 493 pages
...world ; but he ought to have added, that nothing could be more nervous, concise, and intelligible than what he really intended should be understood. It was also remarked of Cromwell, that, though bom of a good family, both by father and mother, and although he had the usual opportunities of education...
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Sir Walter Scott's Woodstock

Walter Scott - 1895 - 566 pages
...; J but he ought to have added, that nothing could be more nervous, concise, and intelligible, than what he really intended should be understood. It was...although he had the usual opportunities of education 2 and breeding connected with such an advantage, the fanatic democratic ruler could never acquire,...
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