The London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science

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Taylor & Francis, 1855

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Page 146 - If the molecular changes occurring during the decomposition of an azotized substance be capable of converting sugar into lactic acid, why should not the molecular changes occurring during the building-up or elaboration of this same nitrogenized compound effect the same ? Indeed, we have seen that the process of destruction is carried on to a certain extent in the systemic capillaries, and more especially in those of the chylo-poietic viscera, where the molecular changes of nutrition are also correspondingly...
Page 226 - ... ascribe electrical phenomena to the action of a peculiar fluid. Such conceptions have their advantages and their disadvantages : they afford peaceful lodging to the intellect for a time, but they also circumscribe it ; and by and by, when the mind has grown too large for its mansion, it often finds a difficulty in breaking down the walls of what has become its prison instead of its home.
Page 218 - The method which I have adopted is very simple. It consists in placing a little mirror, fixed on a long handle suitably bent, in the throat of the person experimented on, against the soft palate and uvula. The party ought to turn himself towards the sun, so that the luminous rays falling on the little mirror may be reflected on the larynx. If the observer experiment on himself, he ought, by means of a second mirror, to receive the rays of the sun, and direct them on the mirror which is placed against...
Page 388 - ... is passing from the one hemisphere to the other, and when the magnetic direction in the course of its annual variation from east to west, or vice versa, coincides with the direction which is the mean declination of all the months and of all the hours. The annual variation is obviously connected with , and dependent on, the earth's position in its orbit relatively to the sun , around which it revolves ; as the diurnal variation is connected with and dependent on the rotation of the earth on...
Page 273 - ... been adhered to : if this be the case, then the inference appears unavoidable, that the diamagnetic force is a polar force, the polarity of diamagnetic bodies being opposed to that of paramagnetic ones under the same conditions of excitement-^-.
Page 330 - Thomson explains these two parts of the phenomena is, that the more watery portions of the entire surface, having more tension than those which are more alcoholic, drag the latter briskly away, sometimes even so as to form a horizontal ring of liquid high up round the interior of the vessel, and thicker than that by which the interior of the vessel was wet. Then the tendency is for the various parts of this ring or line to run together to those parts which happen to be most watery, and so...
Page 101 - ... there are such considerations, I am obliged to reserve my judgment. In the first place all bodies not electrolytic, even up to gases (Becquerel,) are admitted to possess conduction proper ; a priori, therefore, we have reason to expect that electrolytes will possess it also. If from amongst different bodies we retain for consideration the class of electrolytes only, then though the amount of electricity of a given intensity which these can transmit electrolytically when they are fluid, is often...
Page 60 - ... of the intervening rod each will be made to recede from the other by the same distance, and, by its contraction, to approach it by the same distance. But if they be placed on an inclined plane (one being lower than the other), then when by the increased temperature of the rod its tendency to extend becomes sufficient to push the lower of t!- two bodies downwards, it will not have become sufficient to push the higher upwards.
Page 305 - In the complex type, on the other hand (which is indicated by the narrow and straight-sided form of the superficial cells, and by the multiplication of the horizontal rows of marginal pores), the segments of the concentric zones are elongated into vertical columns with imperfect constrictions at intervals ; instead of a single annular stolon, there are two, one at either end of these columns, between which, moreover, there are usually other lateral communications ; whilst the radiating peduncles,...
Page 103 - ... to exist in the water. For suppose a water bubble to be placed midway between a positive and a negative surface, as in the figure, then the parts at and about p will become charged positive, and those at and about n negative, solely by the disturbance of the electric force originally in the bubble, ie without any direct transmission of the electric force from N or P ; the parts at e or q will have no electric charge, and from those parts to p and n the charge will rise gradually to a maximum....

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