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THE PESTILENCE,

A Punishment for Public Sins,

A

SERMON,

PREACHED IN THE MIDDLE DUTCH CHURCH, NOV. 17, 1822,

AFTER THE

Cessation of the Xellow Fever,

WHICH PREVAILED IN NEW-YORK IN 1822.

BY PASCHAL N. STRONG, A. M.
One of the Collegiate Ministers of the Reformed Dutch Church in New-York

PUBLISHED BY REQUEST.

NEW-YORK:

PUBLISHED BY H. SAGE, 208 BROADWAY.

3822,

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This discourse was prepared for the pulpit, without the most remote idea of its ever being issued from the press. To gratify, however, the earnest and repeated solicitations of his friends, and to correct the many gross misrepresentations made by others of the sentiments he advanced, the author has consented to its publication. The following notes are, to the best of his recollection, the ipsissima verba delivered at the time. Although written with much haste, during a week of almost incessant interruption, it was not deemed fair that the discourse should be altered in any respect whatever. Under these circumstances, it is now submitted to an impartial public.

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“ If ye will not be reformed by me, by these things, but will walk

contrary unto me; then will I also walk contrary unto you, and will punish you yet seven times for your sins.”

As this is the first occasion on which, in the providence of God, I am permitted to address you, since the recent calamity that has befallen our city, I should feel myself wanting in my duty to my Master and to you, did I not offer you some remarks suited to the circumstances under which we now officially meet. On the last Sabbath, such of the congregation as were then in the city, had presented to them truths worthy of their most serious attention, and which I trust will not easily be erased from their remembrance; but as I know that there is a disposition in too many to forget God's judgments, as I know that our late calamity is already forgotten by multitudes in our city, and as the most serious among us cannot meditate too patiently and too deeply upon the 6 strange works” of our God, it surely can be neither unseasonable nor unprofitable to spend another hour in reviewing our recent visitation; and although I may have been anticipated in some of the remarks that I may suggest, yet the truth is apt to produce a deeper and more abiding impression, from being enforced by frequent

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