First (-Fourth) reading book, Book 3

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Page 228 - The wind did blow, the cloak did fly, Like streamer long and gay, Till loop and button failing both At last it flew away. Then might all people well discern The bottles he had slung, A bottle swinging at each side As hath been said or sung. The dogs did bark, the children scream'd, Up flew the windows all, And every soul cried out, Well done ! As loud as he could bawl.
Page 232 - And all the world would stare, If wife should dine at Edmonton, And I should dine at Ware!" So, turning to his horse, he said, "I am in haste to dine; 'Twas for your pleasure you came here, You shall go back for mine.
Page 228 - His long red cloak, well brush'd and neat, He manfully did throw. Now see him mounted once again Upon his nimble steed, Full slowly pacing o'er the stones With caution and good heed ! But, finding soon a smoother road Beneath his well-shod feet, The snorting beast began to trot, Which galled him in his seat. So, Fair and softly...
Page 232 - Ah ! luckless speech, and bootless boast, For which he paid full dear ; For while he spake, a braying ass Did sing most loud and clear ; Whereat his horse did snort, as he Had heard a lion roar, And galloped off with all his might, As he had done before.
Page 136 - That, Father! will I gladly do: Tis scarcely afternoon The minster-clock has just struck two, And yonder is the moon!
Page 226 - I am a linen-draper bold, As all the world doth know, And my good friend the Calender Will lend his horse to go.
Page 108 - THE stately homes of England, How beautiful they stand ! Amidst their tall ancestral trees, O'er all the pleasant land ! The deer across their greensward bound, Through shade and sunny gleam ; And the swan glides past them with the sound Of some rejoicing stream.
Page 226 - For saddle-tree scarce reached had he, His journey to begin, When, turning round his head, he saw Three customers come in. So down he came; for loss of time, Although it grieved him sore, Yet loss of pence, full well he knew, Would trouble him much more. Twas long before the customers Were suited to their mind, When Betty screaming came down stairs, 'The wine is left behind!' 'Good lack,' quoth he 'yet bring it me, My leathern belt likewise, In which I bear my trusty sword, When I do exercise.
Page 143 - His hair is crisp, and black, and long, His face is like the tan ; His brow is wet with honest sweat, He earns whate'er he can, And looks the whole world in the face, For he owes not any man.
Page 230 - Until he came unto the Wash Of Edmonton so gay; And there he threw the Wash about On both sides of the way, Just like unto a trundling mop, Or a wild goose at play. At Edmonton his loving wife From the balcony spied Her tender husband, wondering much To see how he did ride. "Stop, stop, John Gilpin! Here's the house !" They all at once did cry; "The dinner waits, and we are tired;" Said Gilpin, "So am I!

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