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TERMINALIA.

NOTES ON VIRGIL, GEORGIC I.

V. 3. Qui cultus habendo sit pecori is totally mis

Jh. IL

Eratum, p. 48, line 11, after If the subject of a proposition is to," read“ be defined, the definition must give that part of the”

sense the subject of the fourth Georgic, though the poet has occasion to mention it incidentally: and the words in the preceding lines, quid faciat, conveniat, cura, cultus, show that the whole exordium is intended to refer to the rural duties of man. The epithet parcis, it must be confessed, is against this, as it must obviously mean frugal, not, as Wagner supposes, scanty, reared with difficulty. We must then regard it as an epitheton ornans, an epithet appropriate to the word, but not to the context, admitting at the same time that it is decidedly a blemish, introduced as it is in a place where every word used ought to have a peculiar

force. Canning, in a note on the Loves of the Triangles, in the Anti-Jacobin, gives one or two examples which will point out the nature of the fault better than any argument-observing, that in poetical diction, a person is said to breathe the blue air, and drink the hoarse wave."

V. 27. Auctorem frugum is explained by Heyne to mean moderatorem, regnatorem. The word seems rather to be used in its original signification as a derivative of augeo.

V. 32 Tardis has been variously understood, either as an ornamental epithet, or as specifying the summer months, which seem longer in coming to an end. It will have more force, if we suppose it to imply a compliment to Cæsar, who is called upon to speed the months, as with their present staff of constellations they move too slowly. So in Ecl. iv. 50, the coming child is bidden, Adspice convexo nutantem pondere mundum.

V. 44. Some difference of opinion has been entertained on the construction of Zephyro. Dryden regarded it as the dative, “ when earth unbinds her frozen bosom to the western winds." Wakefield connects it with putris. It seems rather to be the ablative of the instrument, the reflexive se resolvit being used where a prose writer would have employed a passive with an ablative of the agent. Heyne says nothing specially, but in his explanation of the whole sentence, has “ terra tepidæ auræ afflatu resolvitur.”

V. 52. Patrios cultusque habitusque locorum. Both Heyne and Wagner appear to have misunderstood these words, the former rendering patrios cultus “colendi rationem usu majorum probatam," and thus being led to separate cultus from habitus by omitting the first que, on the authority of some MSS., the latter explaining the words as put for “ cultus habitusque locorum patriorum,” sc. Patrios cultus seems to mean the natural or customary cultivation, belonging to the soil as it were by he

quos quis colit.”

TERMINALIA.

NOTES ON VIRGIL, GEORGIC I.

V. 3. Qui cultus habendo sit pecori is totally misunderstood by Heyne, who renders it “ quæ cura sit pecoris, quod quis habet.Wagner sees the truth when he makes habendo the gerundial dative, though he contradicts himself a little in the rest of his note, first saying that the notion of the dative is quid aptum sit, conveniat,” and then proceeding to explain this and other passages as if sit were equivalent to aptus sit. The fact seems to be that the dative here, as in other instances, is nearly tantamount to the accusative with ad, “ for the purpose of,” “ with a view to.” The usage is found in Lucretius. Book I. v. 25. Te sociam studeo scribundis versibus esse.

V. 4. Heyne is clearly right in taking experientia of the bee-keeper, not of the bee. The latter is in no sense the subject of the fourth Georgic, though the poet has occasion to mention it incidentally: and the words in the preceding lines, quid faciat, conveniat, cura, cultus, show that the whole exordium is intended to refer to the rural duties of man. The epithet parcis, it must be confessed, is against this, as it must obviously mean frugal, not, as Wagner supposes, scanty, reared with difficulty. We must then regard it as an epitheton ornans, an epithet appropriate to the word, but not to the context, admitting at the same time that it is decidedly a blemish, introduced as it is in a place where every word used ought to have a peculiar

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