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For these he cooquers, or more bravely die
And yields himself a willing sacrifice.

ON THE RESURRECTION.
From ev'ry corner of th’extended earth
The scatter'd dust is call'd to second birth;
The sever'd body now unites again,
And kindred atoms rally ioto men:
Tbe various joints resume their ancient seats
And ev'ry limb its former task repeats.

ON YOUTH.
Fragrant the rose is, but it fades in time:
The violet sweet, but quickly pass'd the prime;
White lilies hang their beads, and soon decay;
And whiter snow in minutes melt away:
Such and so with’ring are our early joys,
Which time, or sickness, speedily destroys.

THE DUTY OF MAN.
First to our God, we must with rev’rence boy,
The second honour to our prince we owe;
Next to wives, parents, children, fit respect,
And to our friends and kindred we direct:
Then we must those, who groan beneath the weight
Of age, disease, or want, commisserate.

ON DESIRE.
From my begipoing, may th' almighty powers
Blessings bestow io never-ceasing showers;
Oh! may I happy be, and always blest !
Of ev'ry joy, of ev'ry wish possess'd!
May plenty dissipate all worldly cares.
And smiling peace bless my revolving years!

ON MORTALITY.
From stately palaces we must remove,
The narrow lodgings of a grave to prove;
Leave the fair train, and the light gilded room,
To lie alone benighted in the tomb.
God only is immortal; man not so ;
Life, to be paid upon demand, we owe.

ON HONEST LABOUR.
Go to the plough or team; go hedge or ditch,
Some honest calling use, no matter which;
Be porter, postman;, take the lab’ring oar:
Employment keeps the bailiffs from the door":
Though thou be mean, thy frugal industry,
Depend upon it, shall rewarded be

ON HEAVEN.
Heaven is our guard, and innocence its care,
For need the just the worst of dangers fear;
It pities the dofenceless, poor man’s grief,
And sends him, when he calls, help and relief,
Its arm, the surest succour, and the best,
Delivers and revenges the distress'd.

ON AN ACTIVE LIFE.
Happy is he, the only happy man,
Who out of choice, does all the good he can;.
Who business loves, and others better wakes,
By prudent industry, and pains he takes :
God's blessing here he'll have and man's esteem,
And, when he dies, his works will follow him.

MISFORTUNES ADVANTAGEOUS.
In all misfortunes, this advantage lies,
They make us humble, and they make us wise :
Let's bear it calmly, though a grievous woe,
And still adore the hand that gives the blow;
And he that can acquire such virtue, gains
An ample recompense for all his pains.

OV CHRIST OUR LIFE.
I am the resurrection, saith the Lord;
Eternal life's the fruit of my eternal word;
Whoever fumly does in me believe,
The grave shall not confine, por hell receive,
Not only this; but those that will rely
Op what I teach, shall never, never die.

ON SUMMER
The panting flocks retire with hasty strides,

To shun Sol's piercing summer-scorching beam, Beneath a rural shade, just by where glides

The murm’ring rivulet and crystal stream: As bleating lambkins dread the summer's sun, The man that's truly wise all sin would shuo.

ON THE SCRIPTURES. Let sacred writings always be admir'd, Whose holy peoman truly were iospir’d; Through all succeeding times, both worst and best, They have run down, and borne the strictest test. A spirit there, in ev'ry line we see, or hope, love, joy, and immortality.

ON A COMPETENCY. Let me, O God, my labours so employ, That I a competency may enjoy;

?

I ask no more than my life's wants supply,
And leave their due to others when I die;
If this thou grant (which nothing doubt I cao)
None ever liy'd or died a richer man.

ON THE FALL OF MAN,
Man was by heaven made to govern all,
But how upsit, demonstrates in his fall:
Created pure, and with a strength endu'd,
Of grace divine, sufficient to have stood;
But alienate from God, he soon became
The child of wrath, pride, misery, and slame.

ON THE SCEPTIC.
No providence the sceptic will allow,
Then let th’ungrateful niortal tell me, how
His tender infancy protection found,
And bow his childhood was with safety erown'd;
How through his youth he came to manly years,
Through many dangers, which he sees and fears!

THE GOOD OF EVIL.
One week's extremity nay teach us more
Than loog prosperity had done before :
Death is forgotten in our easy state,
But troubles mind us of our final fate:
The doing ill affects not us with fears,
But suff'ring ill, brings sorrow, wo, and tearst

ON LYING.
Ou all occasions to declare the truth,
Is most praiseworthy in a virtuous youth:
A fault extenuated by a lie,
Is doubled in reality thereby,
And be that to this vice becomes a slave,
lo fue and briinstone shall bis portion have..

ON FORETHOUGHT.
Rashness and haste make all things insecure;
All great concernments must delays endure;
Think on the meaps, the maoner aod the end,
When any great design thou dost intend ;
And if uncertain thy pretensions be,
Stay till fit time wears out uncertainty.

AUTUMN.
The farmer hastes to gather home his corn,

Secures his haystack with a sturdy prop,
With joyous care deposits in the barn,

What labour gave him, autumn's golden crop.

From hence we find iodulgent nature's good,
Who never lets industry beg her food.

ON TROUBLE.
The happiest man that ever breath'd on earth,
With all the glories of estate and birth, !
Had yet some anxious care to make him know,
No grandeur was above the reach of woe.
To be from all things, that disquiet, free,
Is not consistent with humanity.

ON THE ALMIGHTY POWER:
The lofty coocąve of the vast expanse,
Could never be the effect of giddy chance;
Those beauteous and amazing globes of light,
No power could make, that was not infinite;
But when he spake, each atom of this frame,
From the dark womb of empty nothing came.

T'RIFLE NOT IN DEVOTION. Whither thou go'st conceive, and to what end, When thine owo feet the house of God ascend. There rather hear his life-directing rules, Than offer up the sacrifice of fools: For sinful are their gifts, who neither know What they to God should give, or what they owe.

ON DEATH.
When we have once resign'd our sinful breath,
(For we can die but once) then after death
Th’immortal soul immediately goes
To endless joys, or everlasting woes,
Wise then's the man, who labours to secure
His passage safe, and his reception sure.

CHRIST ON THE CROSS.
Ye wand'ring travellers, that pass this way,
Stand still awhile, these agonies survey:
And on result of serious thoughts declare,
If ever sorrows might with mine compare,
But God, in mercy, hath decreed this cup,
Most willingly, therefore, I drink it up.

LIVE TO DIE.
You, whose fond wishes do to heaven aspire,
Who make ihose blest abodes your sole desire ;
if you are wise, and hope that bliss to gain,
Use well your time, live not an hour iu vain:
Let not the morrow your vain thoughts employ,
But think this day the last you shall enjoy.

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He that will not help himself, shall bave help from

nobody.

PABLE 1.

OF THE WAGONER AND HERCULES.

A

S a wagoner was driving his team, his wagon sunk into

a hole, and stuck fast. The poor man impediately fell upon his knees, and prayed to Hercules that he would get his wagon out of the hole again

Thou fool, says Hercules, whip thy horses, and set thy shoulders to the wheels; and then if thou wilt call upon Hercules, he will help thee.

The interpretation.

Lazy wishes never do a man any service; but if he would have help from God in the time of weed; let him uot only implore his assistance, but make use of his owo best corlea

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