Pictures of Life in England and America: Prose and Poetry

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J. French, 1851 - 252 pages
 

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Page 224 - Sky, mountains, river, winds, lake, lightnings! Ye! With night, and clouds, and thunder, and a soul To make these felt and feeling, well may be Things that have made me watchful ; the far roll Of your departing voices, is the knoll Of what in me is sleepless, — if I rest. But where of ye, oh tempests ! is the goal ? Are ye like those within the human breast? Or do ye find, at length, like eagles, some high nest?
Page 59 - Now nought was heard beneath the skies (The sounds of busy life were still) Save an unhappy Lady's sighs, That issued from that lonely Pile. •LEICESTER!
Page 88 - A parliament member, a justice of peace, At home a poor scarecrow, at London an asse, If lowsie is Lucy, as some volke miscalle it, Then Lucy is lowsie, whatever befall it. He thinks himself great ; Yet an asse in his state, We allow, by his ears, but with asses to mate. If Lucy is lowsie as some volke miscall it, Then sing lowsie Lucy whatever befall it speare did not wait to brave the united puissance of a Knight of the Shire and a country attorney.
Page 7 - Was the Lord displeased against the rivers? was thine anger against the rivers? was thy wrath against the sea, that thou didst ride upon thine horses and thy chariots of salvation?
Page 59 - At court, I'm told, is beauty's throne, Where every lady's passing rare; That eastern flowers, that shame the sun. Are not so glowing, not so fair. "Then...
Page 4 - Here landeth as true a subject, being a prisoner, as ever landed at these stairs ; and before thee, O God! I speak it, having no other friends but thee alone.
Page 64 - What constitutes a state! Not high-raised battlement or labored mound, Thick wall or moated gate; Not cities proud, with spires and turrets crowned ; Not bays and broad-armed ports, Where, laughing at the storm, rich navies ride; Not starred and spangled courts, Where low-browed baseness wafts perfume to pride. No: MEN, high-minded MEN...
Page 31 - There be many smiths in the towne, that use to make knives and all manner of cutting tools, and many lorimers that make bittes, and a great many naylours ; so that a great part of the town is maintained by smiths, who have their iron and sea coal out of Staffordshire...
Page 60 - tis not beauty lures thy vows; Rather ambition's gilded crown Makes thee forget thy humble spouse. "Then, Leicester, why, again I plead (The injured surely may repine) — Why didst thou wed a country maid, When some fair princess might be thine? "Why didst thou praise my humble charms, And, oh! then leave them to decay? Why didst thou win me to thy arms, Then leave me to mourn the livelong day?
Page 7 - The sun and moon stood still in their habitation: at the light of thine arrows they went, and at the shining of thy glittering spear. Thou didst march through the land in indignation, thou didst thresh the heathen in anger.

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