The London, Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science

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Taylor & Francis, 1855

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Page 85 - That gravity should be innate, inherent, and essential to matter, so that one body may act upon another at a distance through a vacuum, without the mediation of anything else, by and through which their action and force may be conveyed from one to another, is to me so great an absurdity that I believe no man who has in philosophical matters a competent faculty of thinking can ever fall into it. Gravity must be caused by an agent acting constantly according to certain laws, but whether this agent...
Page 113 - I have no clear idea of the physical condition constituting the charged magnetic state; ie the state of the source of magnetic power: or of the coercitivity by which that state is either resisted in its attainment, or sustained in its permanent condition ; for the hypotheses as yet put forth give no satisfaction to my mind. I profess rather to point out the difficulties in the way of the views, which are at present somewhat too easily accepted, and to shake men's minds from their habitual trust...
Page 345 - Another mixture called mulsum was composed of wine or must mixed with honey, in the proportion of four of the former to one of the latter.
Page 241 - The difference in the varieties is as great as in the various races of dogs. The berry varies in size from that of a large pea to that of a small plum; its color is green, yellow, flesh-color, red, blue, and black. Sweetness and acidity are mixed in the most varying proportions; its aroma is unsurpassed.
Page 214 - The method which I have adopted is very simple. It consists in placing a little mirror, fixed on a long handle suitably bent, in the throat of the person experimented on, against the soft palate and uvula. The party ought to turn himself towards the sun, so that the luminous rays falling on the little mirror may be reflected on the larynx. If the observer experiment on himself, he ought, by means of a second mirror, to receive the rays of the sun, and direct them on the mirror which is placed against...
Page 260 - February 1854, 1 stated that sheet iron coated with an alloy of lead and tin, in which the quantity of lead is five or six times as great as that of tin, and afterwards platinized, might be substituted with advantage for the platinized silver used in Smee's battery.
Page 326 - Thomson explains these two parts of the phenomena is, that the more watery portions of the entire surface, having more tension than those which are more alcoholic, drag the latter briskly away, sometimes even so as to form a horizontal ring of liquid high up round the interior of the vessel, and thicker than that by which the interior of the vessel was wet. Then the tendency is for the various parts of this ring or line to run together to those parts which happen to be most watery, and so...
Page 282 - ... of their forces. Bismuth or antimony, for example, exhibits the diamagnetic force with greater energy than gold or silver, just as iron or nickel exhibits the magnetic force with greater energy than platinum or chromium. Let two thin bars, ab, cd, fig. 4, of two bodies of different diamagnetic powers, be placed at right angles to each other, so as to form a cross ; let the cross be attached to the end of a lever and suspended horizontally from the point x, before the flat or rounded pole N of...
Page 101 - ... there are such considerations, I am obliged to reserve my judgment. In the first place all bodies not electrolytic, even up to gases (Becquerel,) are admitted to possess conduction proper ; a priori, therefore, we have reason to expect that electrolytes will possess it also. If from amongst different bodies we retain for consideration the class of electrolytes only, then though the amount of electricity of a given intensity which these can transmit electrolytically when they are fluid, is often...
Page 65 - The author has in several cases observed the excretine to crystallize directly in the alcoholic solution of faeces before the addition of lime, and has scarcely any doubt that it exists for the most part in a free state in the excrements, and constitutes one of their immediate principles. As to its source, he observes that it appeared in excess when a considerable quantity of beef had been taken, and in less than the usual quantity in a case of diarrhoea attended with loss of appetite ; but none...

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