Amadís de Gaul, Volume 4

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Page 16 - God, for in this have ye done that for which ye were born, succouring the oppressed and beating down the evildoers. But in this, what should most elate us is the defiance which we have thus given to two so high and powerful princes as are the Emperor of Rome and King Lisuarte, with whom, if they will not be brought to reason and justice we must perforce have great debate and warfare. Noble sirs, what then have we to expect ? certes nothing but that defending the right and reasonable cause against...
Page 335 - She felt nothing till she had passed both the perrons j but when she was within a step of the chamber, she felt hands that pushed her and dragged her back, and three times they forced her back to the marble perron; but she with her fair hands repelled them on both sides, and it seemed as if she were thrusting hands and arms from her, and thus by her perseverance and good heart, but above all by reason of her surpassing beauty, she came, though sorely wearied, to the door of the chamber and laid hold...
Page 13 - ... stocked with sundry things which it had never before known. To the four sides of the Tower water was brought from the neighbouring mountains by metal pipes, and collected into four fountains, and the water spouted so high from the golden pillars and through the mouths of animals, that it was easy to reach it from the windows of the first story, for it was caught in golden basons wrought in the pillar, and by these four fountains was the whole garden watered.
Page 329 - I ask a boon of you, which you will be nothing loth to grant. The king replied, I grant it. Then, Sir, be. pleased to command Oriana before it be dinner time to prove the Arch of True Lovers, and the Forbidden Chamber, for hitherto we have none of us been able to persuade her to the adventure, by reason of her great sadness. I have such confidence in her truth and beauty that I doubt not...
Page 332 - ... and roses in such abundance that they covered the ground, and the sound was far sweeter than what had before been uttered, delightful to all who heard it, so that they would willingly have remained listening so long as it should continue; but as soon as she had passed the arch the sound ceased. She found Olinda and Melicia looking at their own names which were now written in the jasper table ; they, seeing her, joyfully went to her, and led her to behold the images. Oriana looked carefully at...
Page 288 - O lady, with what services can I requite you, that by your consent our loves are now made known ? Oriana answered, It is now, sir, no longer time that you should proffer such courtesies, or that I should receive them. I am now to follow and observe your will with that obedience which wife owes to husband...
Page 332 - King Lisuarte that these also would prove the adventure. In God's name ! quoth the king. They all alighted, and it was agreed that Melicia and Olinda should enter first. They then advanced, and one after the other passed under the arch without opposition, and went where the images of Apolidon and Grimanesa stood; and the figure which stood upon the arch sounded his trumpet sweetly, so that all who heard it were delighted ; for except they who had before heard the same, they had never heard so sweet...
Page 7 - ... that had befallen, she made ready to receive Oriana, whom of all persons in the world she most desired to see, because of her great renown that was every where spread abroad. She therefore wished to appear before her like a lady of such rank and such wealth as indeed she was; the robe which she put on was adorned with roses of gold, wrought with marvellous skill, and bordered with pearls and precious stones of exceeding value, this robe till now she had never worn, having reserved it to wear...
Page 331 - ... turn out otherwise, they replied, that they were so well satisfied, that the proof need not be made. Nay, said the brides, we will attempt it ; if we were elsewhere it might well be excused ; but being at the place, it shall never be thought that we feared in our hearts this proof. Since it is so, replied the husbands, we cannot deny that we shall receive from it the greatest joy that can be. Then they told King Lisuarte that these also would prove the adventure. In God's name ! quoth the king....
Page 12 - I shall only say that the tower stood in the middle of a garden surrounded with a wall of goodly stone and mortar, and the garden was the goodliest that might be seen by reason of its trees and herbs and fountains of sweet water. Of those trees...

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