Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" He was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient poets, had the largest and most comprehensive soul. All the images of nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily: when he describes anything, you more than see... "
A Thousand and One Gems of English Prose - Page 92
1872 - 534 pages
Full view - About this book

The Dramatick Writings of Will. Shakspere: With the Notes of All ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1788
...was yet not rectified, nor his allusions understood ; yet then did Dryden pronounce, " that Shakspere was the man, " who, of all modern and perhaps ancient...not laboriously, but luckily : when " he describes any thing, you more than see it, you " feel it too. Those, who accuse him to have wanted " learning,...
Full view - About this book

The Critical and Miscellaneous Prose Works of John Dryden ..., Volume 1, Part 2

John Dryden - 1800 - 596 pages
...them, in my opinion, at least his equal, perhaps7 his superior. To begin, then, with Shakspeare. He was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient...them not laboriously, but luckily : when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you 7 It is curious to observe with what caution our author speaks,...
Full view - About this book

The Critical and Miscellaneous Prose Works of John Dryden, Now First ...

John Dryden - 1800
...Shakspcare above Jonson ; a caution which proves decisively the wretched taste of the period when he wrote. feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning,...learned; he needed not the spectacles of books to read nature; he looked inwards, and found her there. I cannot say he is every where alike; were he...
Full view - About this book

The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1803
...reading was yet not rectified, nor his allusions understood ; yet then did Dryden pronounce, " that Shakspeare was the man, who, of all modern and perhaps...them not laboriously, but luckily : when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those, who accuse him to have wanted learning, give...
Full view - About this book

The Monthly Mirror: Reflecting Men and Manners : with Strictures ..., Volume 17

1804
...character which Dryden has drawn of Shakeipeire is not only just, but' uncommonly elegant and happy. " He was the man who, of all modern, and perhaps ancient...soul. All the images of nature were still present to hftfi, and lie drew them not labouriously, but luckily. When *e rilescribes any'tliing, you more than...
Full view - About this book

The Plays of William Shakespeare: With Notes of Various Commentators, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1806
...the reading was yet not rectified, nor his allusions understood; yet then did Dryden pronounce, that Shakspeare was the man, who, of all modern and perhaps...them not laboriously, but luckily: when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those, who accuse him to have wanted learning, give...
Full view - About this book

Specimens of English prose-writers, from the earliest times to the ..., Volume 3

George Burnett - 1807
...tragediesi Our author himself, I conceive, is shadowed." Shakspeare. To begin, then, with Shakspeare, He was the man, who of all modern, and perhaps ancient...them not laboriously, but luckily : when he describes any thing, you more than see it you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning,...
Full view - About this book

Specimens of English Prose Writers: From the Earliest Times to the Close of ...

George Burnett - 1807
...tragedies. Our author himself, I conceive, is shadowed." Steflcspearr. To begin, then, with Shakspeare. He was the man, who of all modern, and perhaps ancient...them not laboriously, but luckily : when he describes any thing, you more, than see it you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning,...
Full view - About this book

The Works of John Dryden: Now First Collected ...

John Dryden, Walter Scott - 1808
...them, in my opinion, at least his equal, perhaps his superior. * To begin then with Shakespeare. He was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient...them not laboriously, but luckily : when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give...
Full view - About this book

The plays of William Shakspeare, with the corrections and illustr ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1809
...the reading was yet not rectified, nor his allusions understood; yet then did Dryden-pronounce, "that Shakspeare was the man, who, of all modern, and perhaps...them not laboriously, but luckily: when he describes any thing, you more than see it, you feel it too. Those, who accuse him to have wanted learning, give...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF