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on my mind, is, that perhaps the ultimate arrangement of matter, like its ultimate particles, may form a subject too subtile for human perception. Our information in these respects must be limited, as our powers of perception have their bounds. The imperfection of the human senses does not, however, seem a subject of regret; because it induces a greater necessity for the exertions of intellect; and many subjects appear far more demonstrable to reason than to sense.

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Fontana, it must be granted, possessed considerable talent in microscopical observations, for he says, that he could readily distinguish the nature of any animal substance, which might be placed on the field of his microscope, by regarding its ultimate fibres, and, according to him the muscular fibres are much smaller than those of the nerves. Proscaska and others

con25 assert, that the ultimate muscular fibres are continued throughout the whole length of a muscle. How marvellous, (could we but see it,) would such a slender thread appear, continued throughout the whole length of the human sartorius. Haller, however, affirms, that the fibres are not continued, but that one. set terminating another begins. Suspecting that Haller employed the solar microscope on this occasion, as he says he had done on others, I examined muscular fibres with this ins strument. Now though I place no confidence in my own observation, and think clusion that may be deduced from it, yet I will tell you how a portion of a muscle appeared to me when magnified about 500 times. The fibres were slightly, undulating, and one seti terminating, another began: neither were the sets of fibres of considerable length. The mus

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on my mind, is, that perhaps the ultimate arrangement of matter, like its ultimate particles, may form a subject too subtile for human perception.

Our information in these respects must be limited, as our powers of perception have their bounds. The imperfection of the human senses does not, however, seem a subject of regret; because it induces a greater necessity for the exertions of intellect; and many subjects appear far more demonstrable to reason than to sense.

Fontana, it must be granted, possessed considerable talent in microscopical observations, for he says, that he could readily distinguish the nature of any animal, substance, which might be placed on the field of his microscope, by regarding its ultimate fibres, and according to him the muscular fibres are much smaller than those of the nerves. Proscaska and others

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assert, that the ultimate muscular fibres are continued throughout the whole - length of a muscle. How marvellous, (could we but see it,) would such a slender thread appear, continued throughout the whole length of the human sårtorius. Haller) however, affirms, that the fibres are not continued, but that one. set terminating another begins. Suspecting that Haller employed the solar microscope on this occasion, as he

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he had done on others, I examined muscular fibres with this ins strument. Now though I place no confidence in my own observation, and think the subject unimportant as to any conclusion that may be deduced from it, yet I will tell you how au portion of a muscle appeared to me when magnified about 500 times.' The fibres were slightly, undulating, and one seti terminating, another began: neither were the sets of fibres of considerable length. The mus

ing, as it were, in review, a series of facts or propositions, and steadily con

templating them so as to arrange, assort, -, or compare them till we form some de

duction' respecting them. This power seems to belong exclusively to man, and is the basis of his reasoning faculty. That mind is the strongest which can contemplate the greatest number of facts or propositions with accuracy; and his judgments are generally the most correct, who omits to review none of the facts belonging to the subject under his consideration. It was this power of mind that so eminently distinguished Newton from other 'men." It was this power that "enábled him to arrange the whole of a treatise in his thoughts, before he committed a single idea to paper. In the exercise of this power, he was known occasionally to have passed a night or day entirely inattentive to surrounding objects

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