A general history of quadrupeds [by R. Beilby]. The figures engr. on wood by T. Bewick

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 352 - My hounds are bred out of the Spartan kind, So flew"d, so sanded; and their heads are hung With ears that sweep away the morning dew ; Crook-kneed and dew-lapp'd like Thessalian bulls ; Slow in pursuit, but match'd in mouth like bells, Each under each.
Page 131 - Their rein deer form their riches ; these their tents, Their robes, their beds, and all their homely wealth, Supply, their wholesome fare and cheerful cups. Obsequious at their call, the docile tribe Yield to the sled their necks, and whirl them swift O'er hill and dale, heap'd into one expanse Of marbled snow, as far as eye can sweep, With a blue crust of ice unbounded glazed.
Page 40 - ... that happened to the writer of this narrative, who found a hidden calf, two days old, very lean and very weak : On stroking its head, it got up, pawed two or three times like an old Bull, bellowed very loud...
Page 109 - ... a tobacco pipe ; it is about seven inches high, and about twelve from the point of the nose to the insertion of the tail. It is the most delicately shaped animal in the world, being completely formed like a stag in miniature ; except that its horns, when it has any, are more of the gazelle kind, being hollow and annulated in the same manner.
Page 39 - ... with equal speed, but not to the same distance ; forming a shorter circle, and again returning with a bolder and more threatening aspect than before, they approach much nearer, probably within thirty yards, when they make another stand, and again...
Page 337 - One of the dogs being put into the den, was soon disabled by the lion, who took him by the head and neck, and dragged him about. Another dog was then let loose, and served in the same manner ; but the third being put in, immediately seized the lion by the lip...
Page 354 - Flourish'd in air, low bending plies around His busy nose, .the steaming vapour snuffs Inquisitive, nor leaves one turf untried, Till, conscious of the recent stains, his heart Beats quick; his snuffling nose, his active tail, Attest his joy ; then with deep opening mouth, That makes the welkin tremble, he proclaims Th' audacious felon ; foot by foot he marks His winding way, while all the listening crowd Applaud his reasonings.
Page 379 - The colour of the back is dark brown, or liver- coloured; but is lighter on the sides, which are beautifully marked with lines of white spots, running in parallel directions from its throat to its rump; those on the upper part of the body are perfectly distinct; the belly is white. Its head is large; its ears short and naked; its eyes full, and placed high in its head, near the ears; it has two strong yellow cutting teeth in each jaw; its mouth is small; its upper lip divided; and it has long whiskers...
Page 23 - ... and unmixed ; and the black, or brown, thick and lustrous. Such is the beauty of this creature, that it Seems by nature fitted to satisfy the pride and the pleasure of man ; and formed to be taken into his service. Hitherto, however, it appears to have disdained servitude ; and neither force nor kindness have been able to wean it from its native independence and ferocity.
Page 82 - ... they live between twenty and thirty years. Their flesh is good to eat ; and they are found to have ten or twelve pounds of suet, which far surpasses that of the goat in hardness and goodness. The chamois has scarcely any cry, as most animals are known to .have ; . if it has any, it is a kind of feeble bleat, by which the parent calls its young, But in cases of danger, and when it is to warn the rest of the flock, it uses a hissing noise, which is heard at a great distance. For it is to be observed...

Bibliographic information