The Works of Samuel Johnson: LL.D. A New Edition in Twelve Volumes. With an Essay on His Life and Genius, by Arthur Murphy, Esq, Volume 11

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F. C. and J. Rivington, 1823
 

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Page 358 - The gates of hell are open night and day ; Smooth the descent, and easy is the way : But, to return, and view the cheerful skies In this the task and mighty labour lies.
Page 230 - ... a hardened and shameless Tea-drinker, who has for twenty years diluted his meals with only the infusion of this fascinating plant, whose kettle has scarcely time to cool, who with Tea amuses the evening, with Tea solaces the midnight, and with Tea welcomes the morning.
Page 304 - This praise the general interest of mankind requires to be given to writers who please and do not corrupt, who instruct and do not weary. But to them all human eulogies are vain, whom I believe applauded by angels, and numbered with the juat.
Page 518 - O DEATH, how bitter is the remembrance of thee to a man that liveth at rest in his possessions, Unto the man that hath nothing to vex him, and that hath prosperity in all things: Yea, unto him that is yet able to receive meat!
Page 402 - Horace becomes graceful and familiar ; and that such a compliment was at least possible, we know from the transformation feigned by Horace of himself. The most elegant compliment that was paid to Addison, is of this obscure and perishable kind ; When panting Virtue her last efforts made, You brought your Clio to the virgin's aid.
Page 513 - There is, indeed, no topick on which it is more superfluous to accumulate authorities, nor any assertion of which our own eyes will more easily discover, or our sensations more frequently impress the truth, than, that misery is the lot of man, that our present state is a state of danger and infelicity.
Page 436 - Paris in his twenty-first year, and affixed on the gate of the college of Navarre a kind of challenge to the learned of that...
Page 500 - ... of his endeavours by an expectation which, though not certain, he knows to be just; and is at last comforted in his disappointment by the consciousness that he has not failed by his own fault. That kind of life is most happy which affords us most opportunities of gaining our own esteem ; and what can any man infer in his own favour from a condition to which, however prosperous, he contributed nothing, and which the vilest and weakest of the species would have obtained by the same right, had he...
Page 484 - We have less reason to be surprised or offended when we find others differ from us in opinion, because we very often differ from ourselves. How often we alter our minds, we do not always remark ; because the change is sometimes made imperceptibly and gradually, and the last conviction effaces...
Page 500 - Intrust thy fortune to the powers above. Leave them to manage for thee, and to grant What their unerring wisdom sees thee want. In goodness as in greatness they excel; Ah, that we loved ourselves but half so well!

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