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But with a knave of common hire, a gondolier-
To the gross clasps of a lascivious Moor,-
If this be known to you, and your allowance,
We then have done you bold and saucy wrongs;
But if you know not this, my manners tell me,
We have your wrong rebuke. Do not believe,
That, from the sense of all civility,
I thus would play and trifle with your reverence.
Your daughter,---if you have not given her leave,-
I say again, hath made a gross revolt;
Tying her duty, beauty, wit, and fortunes,
In an extravagant 3 and wheeling stranger,
Of here and every where. Straight satisfy yourself ;]
If she be in her chamber, or your house,
Let loose on me the justice of the state
For thus deluding you.
Bra.

Strike on the tinder, ho!
Give me a taper ;-call up all my people.-
This accident is not unlike my dream;
Belief of it oppresses me already.-
Light, I say! light!

[Ex:1, from above. Tago.

Farewell; for I must leave you. It seems not meet, nor wholesome to my place, To be produced (as, if I stay, I shall) Against the Moor. For, I do know, the stateHowever this may gall him with some checkCannot with safety cast 5 him! for he's embarked With such loud reason to the Cyprus' wars, (Which even now stand in act,) that, for their souls, Another of his fathom they have not, . To lead their business ; in which regard, Though I do hate him as I do bell-pains, Yet, for necessity of present life, I must show out a flag and sign of love,

1 i. e. done with your approbation. 2 That is, in opposition to or departing from the sense of all civility.

3 Extravagant is here again used in its Latin sense, for wandering. In is here used for on; a common substitution in ancient phraseology.

4 i. e. some rebuke.
5 That is, dismiss him.

In honest plainness thou hast heard me say,
My daughter is not for thee; and now, in madness,
Being full of supper, and distempering draughts,
Upon malicious bravery, dost thou come
To start my quiet.

Rod. Sir, sir, sir, sir, —
Bra.

But thou must needs be sure,
My spirit, and my place, have in them power
To make this bitter to thee.
Rod.

Patience, good sir.
Bra. What tell'st thou me of robbing ? This is

Venice;
My house is not a grange.?
Rod.

Most grave Brabantio, In simple and pure soul I come to you.

Tago. 'Zounds, sir, you are one of those that will not serve God if the devil bid you. Because we come to do you service, you think we are ruffians. You'll have your daughter covered with a Barbary horse ; you'll have your nephews ? neigh to you; you'll have coursers for cousins, and genets for germans.3

Bra. What profane wretch art thou ?

Iago. I am one, sir, that comes to tell you your daughter and the Moor are now making the beast with two backs.

Bra. Thou art a villain.
Tago.

You are-a senator.
Bra. This thou shalt answer. I know thee, Ro-

derigo. Rod. Sir, I will answer any thing. But I beseech

you, rif't be your pleasure, and most wise consent, (As partly, I find, it is,) that your fair daughter At this odd-even 4 and dull watch o’the night, Transported—with no worse nor better guard,

i Grange is, strictly, the farm of a monastery; but, provincially, any lone house or solitary farm is called a grange.

2 Nephews here mean grandchildren. 3 i. e. horses for relations. A genet is a Spanish or Barbary horse.

4 This odd-even appears to mean the interval between twelve at night and one in the morning.

But with a knave of common hire, a gondolier-
To the gross clasps of a lascivious Moor,-
If this be known to you, and your allowance,
We then have done you bold and saucy wrongs;
But if you know not this, my manners tell me,
We have your wrong rebuke. Do not believe,
That, from the sense of all civility,
I thus would play and trifle with your reverence.
Your daughter,-if you have not given her leave,-
I say again, hath made a gross revolt;
Tying her duty, beauty, wit, and fortunes,
In an extravagant ? and wheeling stranger,
Of here and every where. Straight satisfy yourself ;]
If she be in her chamber, or your house,
Let loose on me the justice of the state
For thus deluding you.
Bra.

Strike on the tinder, ho!
Give me a taper ;-call up all my people. —
This accident is not unlike my dream;
Belief of it oppresses me already.-
Light, I say! light!

[Ezit, from above. Tago.

Farewell; for I must leave you. It seems not meet, nor wholesome to my place, To be produced (as, if I stay, I shall) Against the Moor. For, I do know, the stateHowever this may gall him with some checkCannot with safety cast 5 him! for he's embarked With such loud reason to the Cyprus’ wars, (Which even now stand in act,) that, for their souls, Another of his fathom they have not, To lead their business; in which regard, Though I do hate him as I do hell-pains, Yet, for necessity of present life, I must show out a flag and sign of love,

1 i. e. done with your approbation. 2 That is, in opposition to or departing from the sense of all civility.

3 Extravagant is here again used in its Latin sense, for wandering. In is here used for on; a common substitution in ancient phraseology.

4 i. e, some rebuke.
5 That is, dismiss him.

May speak, unbonneted,' to as proud a fortune
As this that I have reached. For know, lago,
But that I love the gentle Desdemona,
I would not my unhoused, free condition
Put into circumscription and confine
For the sea's worth. But, look! what lights come

yonder ?

Enter Cassio, at a distance, and certain Officers with

torches.
lago. These are the raised father, and his friends.
You were best go in.
Oth.

Not I; I must be found;
My parts, my title, and my perfect soul,
Shall manifest me rightly. Is it they?

Iago. By Janus, I think no.

Oth. The servants of the duke, and my lieutenant.
The goodness of the night upon you, friends!
What is the news?

The duke does greet you, general;
And he requires your haste, post-haste* appearance,
Even on the instant.
Oth.

What is the matter, think you ?
Cas. Something from Cyprus, as I may divine;
It is a business of some heat. The galleys
Have sent a dozen sequent messengers
This very night at one another's heels;
And many of the consuls, raised, and met,
Are at the duke's already. You have been hotly called

for;
When, being not at your lodging to be found,

Cas.

INC

------

1 “I am his equal or superior in rank; and were it not so, such are my merits, that, unbonneterl, without the addition of patrician or senatorial dignity, they may speak to as proud a fortune," &c.

9 i. e. unsettled, free from domestic cares.

3 Pliny, the naturalist, has a chapter on the riches of the sea. The expression seems to have been proverbial.

These words were ordinarily written on the covers of letters or packets requiring the most prompt and speedy conveyance; often reduplicated thus :" Haste, haste, haste, posl-haste!'

5 See note 4, p. 400.

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The senate hath sent about three several quests,
To search you out.
Oth.

'Tis well I am found by you.
I will but spend a word here in the house,
And go with you.
Cas.

Ancient, what makes he here?
Tago. ?Faith, he to-night hath boarded a land

carrack; 2
If it prove lawful prize, he's made forever.

Cas. I do not understand.
Tago.

He's married.
Cas.

To who?

Re-enter OTHELLO.
Tago. Marry, to—come, captain, will you go?
Oth.

Have with you. Cas. Here comes another troop to seek for you.

Enter BRABANTIO, Roderigo, and Officers of night,

with torches and weapons.
Iago. It is Brabantio.--General, be advised ; 3
He comes to bad intent.
Oth.

Hola! stand there!
Rod. Seignior, it is the Moor.
Bra.

Down with him, thief!

[They draw on both sides. Iago. You, Roderigo! come, sir, I am for you. Oth. Keep up your bright swords, for the dew will

rust them.Good seignior, you shall more command with years, Than with your weapons. Bra. O thou foul thief, where hast thou stowed my

daughter? Damned as thou art, thou hast enchanted her;

1 Quests are here put for messengers ; properly it signified searchers.

2 A carrack, or carrick, was a ship of great burden, a Spanish galleon ; so named froin carico, a lading, or fieight.

3 i. e, be cautious, be discret.

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