The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: Including a Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides, Volume 3

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J. Murray, 1831
 

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Page 221 - The greatest part of a writer's time is spent in reading, in order to write; a man will turn over half a library to make one book.
Page 32 - We were now treading that illustrious island, which was once the luminary of the Caledonian regions, whence savage clans and roving barbarians derived the benefits of knowledge., and the blessings of religion.
Page 341 - as I enter the door of a tavern, I experience an oblivion of care, and a freedom from solicitude : when I am seated, I find the master courteous, and the servants obsequious to my call ; anxious to know and ready to supply my wants : wine there exhilarates my spirits, and prompts me to free conversation and an interchange of discourse with those whom I most love : I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinion and sentiments I find delight.
Page 373 - Why art thou then cast down, my soul ? What should discourage thee ? And why with vexing thoughts art thou Disquieted in me?
Page 399 - Reviewers (said he) are not Deists ; but they are Christians with as little Christianity as may be ; and are for pulling down all establishments. The Critical Reviewers are for supporting the constitution, both in church and state. The Critical Reviewers, I believe, often review without reading the books through ; but lay hold of a topick, and write chiefly from their own minds. The Monthly Reviewers are duller men, and are glad to read the books through.
Page 296 - The writer of an epitaph should not be considered as saying nothing but what is strictly true. Allowance must be made for some degree of exaggerated praise. In lapidary inscriptions a man is not upon oath...
Page 431 - I therefore, while we were sitting quietly by ourselves at his house in an evening, took occasion to open my plan thus : 'Mr. Dilly, Sir, sends his respectful compliments to you, and would be happy if you would do him the honour to dine with him on Wednesday next along with me, as I must soon go to Scotland.
Page 42 - Stern o'er each bosom reason holds her state With daring aims irregularly great ; Pride in their port, defiance in their eye, I see the lords of human kind pass by ; Intent on high designs, a thoughtful band, By forms unfashion'd, fresh from nature's hand, Fierce in their native hardiness of soul, True to imagined right, above control, While e'en the peasant boasts these rights to scan, And learns to venerate himself as man.
Page 434 - Pray give me leave, Sir It is better here A little of the brown Some fat, Sir A little of the stuffing Some gravy Let me have the pleasure of giving you some butter Allow me to recommend a squeeze of this orange or the lemon, perhaps, may have more zest." "Sir, Sir, I am obliged to you, Sir...
Page 236 - If you come to settle here, we will have one day in the week on which we will meet by ourselves. That is the happiest conversation where there is no competition, no vanity, but a calm quiet interchange of sentiments.

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