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Page 364 - And hardly do we guess aright at things that are upon earth, and with labour do we find the things that are before us: but the things that are in heaven who hath searched out?
Page 309 - Under whatever aspect we view this cranium, whether we regard its vertical depression, the enormous thickness of its supraciliary ridges, its sloping occiput, or its long and straight squamosal suture, we meet with ape-like characters, stamping it as the most pithecoid of human crania yet discovered.
Page 159 - ... may cause the famine which scientific agriculture will have prevented. Fortunately, however, for the human race, the cereals, the best single article of food, are peculiarly suitable to a cold climate. Barley is cultivated in Iceland, and oatmeal feeds the best brain and muscle of the world in the high latitudes of Europe. It is probably true that all life, vegetable and animal, had its origin in the boreal circumpolar regions. Life has already been pushed half-way to the equator, and slowly...
Page 28 - The Government of the United States and the Governments of the several States stand ready to cooperate.
Page 298 - If, under such circumstances, disease or the casualties of a hunter's life should carry off the parents, the survival of the children would, it is evident, depend mainly upon the nature of the climate and the ease with which food could be procured at all seasons of the year. In ancient Europe, after the present climatal conditions were established, it is doubtful if a family of children under ten years of age could have lived through a single winter. We are not, therefore, surprised to find that...
Page xxiii - The objects of the Association are, by periodical and migratory meetings, to promote intercourse between those who are cultivating science in different parts of...
Page 364 - And how could any thing have endured, if it had not been thy will? or been preserved, if not called by thee? But thou sparest all: for they are thine, O Lord, thou lover of souls.
Page 15 - ... history. The brecciated appearance of many specimens, the fact that the fragments in a breccia are themselves a finer breccia, the fractures, infiltrations and apparent faultings seen in microscopic sections, and by the naked eye, ó these all imply the action of force. M. Daubree supposes that the union of oxygen and silicon furnishes sufficient heat for making these minerals. If this be possible those transformations may have taken place in their first home. Dr.
Page xxii - American Association for the Advancement of Science," and their successors, are hereby made a corporation by the name of the " American Association for the Advancement of Science...
Page 63 - Hamilton's system, in which the vector is the fundamental idea, is nevetherless made a quadruple algebra by the addition of ordinary numerical quantities. For practical purposes, we may regard Hamilton's system as equivalent to Grassmann's algebra of vectors. Such practical equivalence is of course consistent with great differences of notation, and of the point of view from which the subject is regarded. Perhaps I should add a word in regard to the nature of the problems which require a vector analysis,...

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