The Writings of James Russell Lowell ...: Literary and political addresses

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Printed at the Riverside Press, 1890 - 290 pages

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Page 85 - Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. That is, some books are to. be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention.
Page 103 - LET US NOW PRAISE FAMOUS MEN, AND OUR FATHERS THAT BEgat us. The Lord hath wrought great glory by them through his great power from the beginning. Such as did bear rule in their kingdoms, men renowned for their power, giving counsel by their understanding, and declaring prophecies: leaders of the people by their counsels, and by their knowledge of learning meet for the people, wise and eloquent in their instructions...
Page 164 - Your children do not grow faster from infancy to manhood than they spread from families to communities, and from villages to nations.
Page 43 - None knew him but to love him, None named him but to praise.
Page 104 - And some there be, which have no memorial; who are perished, as though they had never been; and are become as though they had never been born; and their children after them.
Page 27 - A king lived long ago, In the morning of the world, When earth was nigher heaven than now ; And the king's locks curled, Disparting o'er a forehead full As the milk-white space 'twixt horn and horn Of some sacrificial bull Only calm as a babe new-born : For he was got to a sleepy mood, So safe from all decrepitude...
Page 77 - How seldom, friend, a good great man inherits Honour or wealth with all his worth and pains ! It sounds like stories from the land of spirits, If any man obtain that which he merits, Or any merit that which he obtains.
Page 156 - And I honor the man who is willing to sink Half his present repute for the freedom to think, And, when he has thought, be his cause strong or weak, Will risk t...
Page 17 - There is no good in arguing with the inevitable. The only argument available with an east wind is to put on your overcoat.
Page 140 - Let it be our hope to make a gentleman of every youth who is put under our charge ; not a conventional gentleman, but a man of culture, a man of intellectual resource, a man of public spirit, a man of refinement, with that good taste which is the conscience of the mind, and that conscience which is~ the good taste of the soul.

About the author (1890)

James Russell Lowell (February 22, 1819 - August 12, 1891) was an American Romantic poet, critic, editor, and diplomat. He is associated with the Fireside Poets, a group of New England writers. But Lowell's real strengths as a writer are better found in his prose essays than in his verse. A man great in literary learning (he was professor of belles-lettres at Harvard College for many years), wise and passionate in his commitments, he was a great upholder of tradition and value. His essays on the great writers of England and Europe still endure, distinguished not only by their astute insights into the literary classics of Western culture, but also by their spectacular style and stunning wit. Lowell graduated from Harvard College in 1838 and went on to earn a law degree from Harvard Law School. He published his first collection of poetry in 1841. Nor was Lowell merely a dweller in an ivory tower. In his youth, he worked passionately for the cause of abolition, risking his literary reputation for a principle that he saw as absolute. In his middle years, he was founding editor of the Atlantic Monthly and guided it during its early years toward its enormous success. In his final years, this great example of American character and style represented the United States first as minister to Spain (1877--80), and afterwards to Great Britain (1880--85). Lowell was married twice: First to the poet Mary White Lowell, who died of tuberculosis, and second to Frances Dunlap. He died on August 12, 1891, at his home, Elmwood. He was buried in Mount Auburn Cemetery.

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