Travels in Northern Greece, Volume 3

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Page 154 - Romanus cunctis petitur cruor : inde sagittae, Inde faces et saxa volant, spatioque solutae Aeris et calido liquefactae pondere glandes. Tune et...
Page 372 - Haec domus, haec sedes, haec sunt penetralia magni Amnis : in hoc, residens facto de cautibus antro, Undis jura dabat , Nymphisque colentibus undas.
Page 370 - Daphne * is mixed with the wild olive, the arbutus, the agnus castus, the paliurus, and the lentisk, festooned in many places with wild grapes and other climbers. The limestone cliffs rise with equal abruptness on either side, but their white and bare sides are beautifully relieved by patches of dwarf oaks, velanidhies, and a variety of the common shrubs of Greece ', while occasional openings afford a glimpse of some of the nearer heights of the two mountains, clothed with large oaks and firs ; in...
Page 139 - EirtJ,iyij.itau) is at the distance of half an hour from Khiliandarion, and is situated on the edge of the sea, at the mouth of a torrent in a little narrow valley, from which compressed position the name is taken. Part of the convent was once crushed by the fall of some overhanging rocks, and now it is being gradually undermined by the water. This monastery was founded by Theodosius the younger, and his sister Pulcheria, in the 5th century ; but it was afterwards restored in the llth.
Page 261 - Jokull itself exploded, and precipitated masses of ice, many of which were hurled out to the sea; but the thickest remained on the plain, at a short distance from the foot of the mountain. The noise and reports continuing, the atmosphere was so completely filled with fire and ashes, that day could scarcely be distinguished from night, by reason of the darkness which followed, and which was barely rendered visible by the light of the fire that had broken through five or six cracks in...
Page 425 - Herodot. 1. 7, c. 124. MACEDONIA. 449 probably the boundary of Mygdonia towards Bisaltia, which latter extended to the Sintice northward, and eastward to the Strymon, on the right bank of which it included Euporia '. The maritime part of Mygdonia formed a district called Amphaxitis, a chorographical distinction first occurring in Polybius, who seems to divide all the great plain at the head of the Thermaic Gulf into Amphaxitis and Bottiaea2, and which is found three centuries later in Ptolemy 3....
Page 60 - In the middle of the plain of Livadho rises the insulated height of St. George, crowned with a Venetian castle, now abandoned. Strabo seems to have had a most incorrect idea of Cephallenia, for he states that its circumference was only 300 stades, instead of which it is near 800, and that at the gulf containing the cities of the Cranii and Palenses the island was divided into two parts by an isthmus, so low that it was sometimes covered by the sea '. We descend on foot into the head of the valley...
Page 370 - Ante cunctos claritate Peneus, ortus juxta Gomphos, interque Ossam et Olympum nemorosa convalle defluens quingentis stadiis, dimidio ejus spatii navigabilis. In eo cursu Tempe vocantur quinque millia passuum longitudine et ferme sesquijugeri latitudine, ultra visum hominis attollentibus se dextera laevaque leniter convexis jugis. Intus sua luce (al. sub luco) viridante allabitur Peneus, viridis calculo, amaenus circa ripas gramine, canorus avium concentu.
Page 85 - Vezir without orders from the Porte, for which his own head followed the prince's. When interpreter of the Kapitan Pasha, Prince Mavrogheni constructed an aqueduct to supply his native city with water. The town, although not large, nor affording any great appearance of comparative opulence, has an agreeable aspect, as it consists of neat small houses with terraced roofs, surrounded by gardens of oranges and pomegranates, mixed with vines upon trellises. Though dry and well ventilated, without any...
Page 32 - Ulysses was depoMted by the Phoenicians who brought him from Scheria. (Od. xiii. 116, seq.) Leake (I. c.~) considers this to be " the only point in the island exactly corresponding to the poet's data.

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