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Books Books 1 - 10 of 97 on Polite, affable, insinuating, sprightly, and capable of speaking and of writing with....
" Polite, affable, insinuating, sprightly, and capable of speaking and of writing with equal ease and dignity. Sudden, however, and violent in all her attachments; because her heart was warm and unsuspicious. Impatient of contradiction ; because she had... "
Beauties of Dr. Robertson: Containing the most prominent and interesting ... - Page 31
by William Robertson - 1810 - 366 pages
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the monthly review

SEVERAL HANDS - 1759
...arts of government. Not infenfiblc of flattery, or vnconfcious of that pleafure, witli which almoft every woman beholds the influence of her own beauty. Formed with the qualities which we love, not with the talents that we admire ; (he was an agreeable woman, rather than an illufhiuiu...
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The Monthly Review, Or, Literary Journal, Volume 20

Ralph Griffiths, G. E. Griffiths - 1759
...arts of government. Not infenfible of flattiry, or unconfcious of that pleafure, with which almoft every woman beholds the influence of her own beauty. Formed with the qualities which we love, not with the talents that we admire ; fhe was an agreeable woman, rather than an illuftrious...
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The history of Scotland, during the reigns of queen Mary and of ..., Volume 2

William Robertson - 1771
...arts of government. Not infenfible of flattery, or unconfcious of that pleafure, with which almoft every woman beholds the influence of her own beauty. Formed with the qualities which we love, not with the talents that we admire; fhe was an agreeable woman, rather than an illuftrious...
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Lessons in Elocution, Or, A Selection of Pieces in Prose and Verse: For the ...

William Scott - 1789 - 398 pages
...arts of government. Not infenlible to flattery, or unconfcious of that pleafure with which almoft^very woman beholds the influence of her own 'beauty ^ Formed with the qualities that we love, not with the talents that we admire, fhe was an agreeable woman rather than an Uluflrious...
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The Scots Magazine, Volume 21

1759
...neceflary arts c:f government. Not inlenGble of flattery, or unconfcious of that pleafure with which almoft every woman beholds the influence of her own beauty. Formed with the qualities which we love, not with the talents that we admire ; fne was an agreeable woman, rather than an illuftrious...
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The History of Scotland During the Reigns of Queen Mary and of ..., Volume 2

1794
...neceflary arts of government. Not infenfible of flattery, or unconfcious of that pleafure with which almoft every woman beholds the influence of her own beauty. Formed with the qualities which we love, not with the talents that we admire j fhe was an agreeable woman, rather than an illuftrious...
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A View of Universal History, from the Creation to the Present Time ..., Volume 2

John Adams - 1795
...of government ; — not infenfible of flattery, or unconfcious of that ple;:fure', with which almoft every woman beholds the influence of her own beauty ; — formed with the qualities which we love, not with the talents that we admire, fhe was an agreeable woman, rather than an illuftrious...
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Beispielsammlung zur Theorie und Literatur der Schönen ..., Volume 8, Part 2

Johann Joachim Eschenburg - 1795
...arts of governments. Not infenfible to flattery, or unconfcious of that plea. lure, with which almoft every woman beholds the influence of her own beauty. Formed with the qualities, that we love, not with the talents that we admire; flie was an agreeable woman, rather than an illuftrious...
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Elegant Extracts: Or, Useful and Entertaining Passages in Prose ..., Volume 2

1797 - 1120 pages
...arts of government. Not infenfiblc to flattery, or unconfcioos of that plesfure, with which almoft every woman beholds the influence of her own beauty. Formed with the qualities that we love, not with the talents that we admire ; me was an agreeable woman rather than an illuflrious...
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The History of Scotland, During the Reigns of Queen Mary and King ..., Volume 2

William Robertson - 1811
...heart was warm •and unsuspicious. Impatient of contradiction ; because she had been accustomed from her infancy to be treated as a queen. No stranger,...was reckoned among the necessary arts of government. Npt insensible of flattery, or unconscious of that pleasure with which almost every woman beholds the...
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