Amadis of Gaul, Volume 2

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On December 26, 2004, a massive tsunami triggered by an underwater earthquake pummeled the coasts of Thailand, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, and other countries along the Indian Ocean. With casualties as far away as Africa, the aftermath was overwhelming: ships could be spotted miles inland; cars floated in the ocean; legions of the unidentified dead -- an estimated 225,000 -- were buried in mass graves; relief organizations struggled to reach rural areas and provide adequate aid for survivors.

Shortly after this disaster, researchers from around the world traveled to the region's most devastated areas, observing and documenting the tsunami's impact. The Indian Ocean Tsunami: The Global Response to a Natural Disaster offers the first analysis of the response and recovery effort. Editors Pradyumna P. Karan and S. Subbiah, employing an interdisciplinary approach, have assembled an international team of top geographers, geologists, anthropologists, and political scientists to study the environmental, economic, and political effects of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami.

The volume includes chapters that address the tsunami's geo-environmental impact on coastal ecosystems and groundwater systems. Other chapters offer sociocultural perspectives on religious power relations in South India and suggest ways to improve government agencies' response systems for natural disasters.

A clear and definitive analysis of the second deadliest natural disaster on record, The Indian Ocean Tsunami will be of interest to environmentalists and political scientists alike, as well as to planners and administrators of disaster-preparedness programs.

 

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Page 132 - I am now in such extremity, that I cannot live any long time : I beseech you, by that God whose faith you hold, take me with you for the little while I have to live, that I may have comfort for my soul. My horse and arms I need no longer ; I will leave them here, and go with you on foot, and perform whatever penitence you enjoin. If you refuse, you will sin before God ; for else I shall wander and perish in this mountain.
Page 101 - ... Apolidon and Grimanesa, for that was such that not only could no one make the like, but no one could even imagine how it could be made ; it was so devised that they who were within could clearly see what was doing without, but from without nothing could be seen within. There they remained some time with great pleasure : the knights, because one of their lineage was found to exceed in worth all living men, and all who for a hundred years had lived; the islanders, because they trusted to be well...
Page 156 - ... some large trees in the garden near the chapel, that he might there lament, without the knowledge of the hermit or the boys; and calling to mind the great wrong he endured, he made this song in his passion : Sith that the victory of right deserved By wrong they do withhold for which I served ; Now sith my glory thus hath had a fall, Glorious it is to end my life withall. By this my death, likewise my woes release, My hope, my joy, my inflamed love doth cease. But ever will I mind my during pain,...
Page 130 - F5 129 false, you should make the truth known, whereby she will repent of what she hath done, and intreat your forgiveness for the wrong, and you will enjoy your former happiness. It is better to take food with this hope, than, by abandoning yourself to despair, to die and lose her, and the glory of this world, and even the other. Hold thy peace, for God's sake ! quoth Amadis, for such foolishness and lies as thou hast uttered, are enough to provoke the whole world. Oriana, my Lady, has never done...
Page 101 - ... desired that they might be carried to the chamber ; and there the governor with all his train went to Amadis, and kissed his hand as their lord. Then saw they the wonders which were in the chamber, the works of art and the treasures, such that they were amazed to see them. Yet all this was nothing to the chamber of Apolidon and Grimanesa, for that was such, that not only could no one make the like, but no one could even imagine how it could be made ; it was so devised, that they who were within...
Page 189 - ... no me meta en tal cuita vuestro amor. De todas las que yo veo no deseo servir otra sino a vos, bien veo que mi deseo es devaneo do no me puedo partir, pues que no puedo huir de ser vuestro servidor, no me meta sin roseta en tal cuita vuestro amor.
Page 100 - Amadis enter, began to cry out, God be praised, we see accomplished what we have so long desired. When his brethren saw that he had atchieved that wherein they had failed, they were exceedingly joyful, because of the great love they bore him, and desired that they might be carried to the chamber ; and there the governor with all his train went to Amadis, and kissed his hand as their lord. Then saw they the wonders which were in the chamber, the works of art and the treasures, such that they were...
Page 117 - Amadis stood in his stirrups, and gave him a blow on his head, and cut away the trappings of his helmet and the skin of his head, and the sword held on and came upon the neck of the horse, so that he fell dead, and the rider senseless. Amadis waited a minute, thinking that he had slain him ; then seeing him recover, he said, Knight, what love has gained in you, and you in him, you may both enjoy : I leave you. So departing from him, he called Gandalin, and seeing Durin there, he said to him, Friend...
Page 100 - ... sword fell from his hand, and though it hung by a thong from the wrist, he could not recover it, yet holding on still he reached the door of the chamber, and a hand came forth and took him by the hand to draw him in, and he heard a voice which said, Welcome is the knight who shall be lord here, because he passeth in prowess him who made the enchantment, and who had no peer in his time.
Page 254 - Amadis loved some one he could not have passed under the Arch of True Lovers, which yet showed him more honour than ever any other had received. He may love, replied Briolania, but in his love he is the most secret that ever yet knight was. Briolania remained ten days with Oriana, and then they both went to join Queen Brisena at Fenusa, a town, where she was waiting for Lisuarte. Greatly rejoiced was she to see her daughter so recovered. There the tidings came of the victory, for joy whereat Brisena...

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