The Works of Beaumont and Fletcher (Volume 11) ~ Paperbound

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Classic Books Company

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Contents

I
25
II
27
III
44
IV
60
V
82
VI
102
VII
125
VIII
145
XIV
270
XV
289
XVI
307
XVII
331
XVIII
353
XIX
373
XX
400
XXI
415

IX
159
X
179
XI
200
XII
225
XIII
248
XXII
438
XXIII
439
XXIV
515
XXV
519

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Page 247 - Should I turn upon the true prince ? Why, thou knowest I am as valiant as Hercules ; but beware instinct ; the lion will not touch the true prince. Instinct is a great matter; I was a coward on instinct.
Page 502 - What things have we seen Done at the Mermaid ! Heard words that have been So nimble, and so full of subtle flame, As if that every one from whence they came Had meant to put his whole wit in a jest And had resolved to live a fool the rest Of his dull life ; then when there hath been thrown Wit able enough to justify the town For three days past ; wit that might warrant be For the whole City to talk foolishly Till that were cancell'd ; and when that was gone, We left an air behind us, which alone...
Page 331 - Roses, their sharp spines being gone, Not royal in their smells alone, But in their hue ; Maiden pinks, of odour faint, Daisies smell-less, yet most quaint, And sweet thyme true...
Page 492 - LIKE to the falling of a star, Or as the flights of eagles are, Or like the fresh spring's gaudy hue, Or silver drops of morning dew, Or like a wind that chafes the flood, Or bubbles which on water stood : Even such is man, whose borrowed light Is straight called in and paid to-night.
Page 326 - Servants, with great Applause: Written by the memorable worthies of their time, Mr. John Fletcher and Mr. William Shakespeare, Gent.
Page 357 - Yet cousin, Even from the bottom of these miseries, From all that fortune can inflict upon us, I see two comforts rising, two mere blessings, If the gods please to hold here ; a brave patience, And the enjoying of our griefs together. Whilst Palamon is with me, let me perish If I think this our prison.
Page 363 - How I would spread, and fling my wanton arms In at her window ! I would bring her fruit Fit for the gods to feed on ; youth and pleasure, Still as she tasted, should be doubled on her...

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