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neither directly nor indirectly; as also, that the commerce shall not, in prejudice of the said treaty, be made more easy by the fea-ports than by the rivers, canals, and mouths of the sea, on the side of the States of the United provinces, neither directly nor indirectly.

And whereas, by the fixteenth and seventeenth articles of the same treaty of Munster, his majesty the king of Spain is obliged to treat the subjects of their high mightinesses as favourably as the subjects of Great Britain and Hans towns, who were then the people most favourably treated; her Britannic majesty and their high mightinesses promise likewise to take care, that the subjects of Great Britain and of their high mightinesses thall be treated in the Spanish Low-countries, as well as in Spain, the kingdoms and states belonging to it, equally, and as well the one as the other, as the people most fayoured.

ARTICLE XVI. The faid QUEEN and States-general oblige themselves to furnish, by sea and land, the succours and affiftance necessary to maintain, by force, her said majesty in the quiet possession of her kingdoms, and the most serene house of Hanover in the said fucceffion, in the manner it is settled by the acts of parliament beforementioned ; and to maintain the said States-general in the possession of the said barrier,

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ARTICLE XVII. · After the ratifications of the treaty, a particular convention shall be made of the conditions, by which the said QUEEN and the faid lords the States-general will engage themselves to furnish the fuccours which fhall be thought necessary, as well by sea as by Jand.

ARTICLE XVIII. If her British majesty, or the States-general of the United provinces, be attacked by any body whatfoever by reason of this convention, they shall mutually affift one another with all their forces, and become guarantees of the execution of the said convention.

ARTICLE XIX. There (all be invited and admitted into the present treaty, as soon as possible, all the kings, princes, and states, who shall be willing to enter into the same, particularly his Imperial majesty, the kings of Spain and Prusia, and the elector of Hanover. And her British majesty and the States-general of the United provinces, and each of them in particular, shall be permitted to require and invite those, whom they shall think fit to require and invite, to enter into this treaty, and to be guarantees of its execution.

ARTICLE XX. And as time hath shewn the omission, which was made in the treaty signed at Ryswick in the year

1697

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1697, between England and France, in respect of the right of the succession of England in the person of her majesty the Queen of Great Britain, now reigning; and that, for want of having settled in that treaty this indisputable right of her majesty, France refused to acknowledge her for Queen of Great Britain after the death of the late king William the third of glorious memory : her majesty the QUEEN of Great Britain and the lords the Statesgeneral of the United provinces do agree, and engage themselves, likewise not to enter into any negotiation or treaty of peace with France, before the title of her majesty to the crown of Great Britain, as also the right of succession of the most serene house of Hanover to the aforesaid crown, in the manner it is settled and established by the beforementioned acts of parliament, be fully acknowledged as a preliminary by France; and that France hath promised, at the same time, to remove, out of its dominions, the person who pretends to be king of Great Britain ; and that no negotiation, or formal discusion of the articles of the said treaty of peace, shall be entered into, but jointly, and at the same time, with the said QUEEN, or with her ministers.

ARTICLE XXI. Her British majesty, and the lords the States-general of the United provinces, shall ratify and confirm all that is contained in the present treaty within the space of four weeks, to be reckoned from the day of the signing. In testiinony whereof the un

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derwritten ambassador extraordinary and plenipotentiary of her British majesty, and the deputies of the lords the States-general, have figned this present treaty, and have affixed their seals thereụnto.

At the Hague the 29th of October, in the year 1709;

(L. S.) Townshend. (L. S.) 7. B. Van Reede. (L. S.) G. Hoeuft. (L. S.) E. 7. Ittersum. (L. S.) 7. V. Welderen. (L. S.) A. Heinfus. (L. S.) H. Sminia. (L. S.) W. Wichers.

THE SEPARATE ARTICLE.
s in the preliminary articles signed here at the Ha-

gue the 28th of May 1709, by the plenipotentiaries of his Imperial majesty, of her majesty the QUEEN of Great Britain, and of the lords the States-general of the United provinces, it is ftipulated, amongst other things, that the lords the States-general shall have, with entire property and sovereignty, the upper quarter of Guelder, according to the fifty-second article of the treaty of Munster of the year 1648; as also, that the garrisons which are, or hereafter shall be, on the part of the lords the States-general, in the town of Huy, the citadel of Liege, and in the town of Bonne, soall remain there, until it shall be otherwise agreed upon with his Imperial majesty and the empire: and as the barrier, which is this day agreed upon, in the princi

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pal treaty for the mutual guarantee, between her British majesty and the lords the States-general, cannot give, to the United provinces, the safety for which it is eftablished, unlefs it be well secured from one end to the other, and that the communication of it be well joined together, for which the upper quarter of Guelder, and the garrisons in the citadel of Liege, Huy, and Bonne are absolutely necessary (experience having thrice shewn, that France, having a design to attack the United provinces, has made use of the places abovementioned, in order to come at them, and to penetrate into the faid provinces). And further, as in respect to the equivalent for which the upper quarter of Guelder is to be gielded to the United provinces, according to the fiftysecond article of the treaty of Munfter abovementioned, his majesty king Charles III, will be much more gra. tified and advantaged in other places, than that equivalent can avail. To the end therefore that the lords the States-general may have the upper quarter of Guelder, with entire property and sovereignty ; and that the said upper quarter of Guelder may be yielded, in this manner, to the said lords the States-general, in the convention, or the treaty that they are to make with his majesty king Charles III, according to the thirteenth article of the treaty concluded this day; as also that their garrisons in the citadel of Liege, in that of Huy, and in Bonne, may remain there, until it be otherwise agreed upon with his Imperial majesty and the empire ; her majesty the QUEEN of Great Britain engages herself, and promises, by this separate article, which fall have the same force as if it were inserted in the prin

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